Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Danny Hajek/NPR
Rebecca Hersher
Danny Hajek/NPR

Rebecca Hersher

Reporter, Science Desk

Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk, where she reports on outbreaks, natural disasters, and environmental and health research. Since coming to NPR in 2011, she has covered the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, embedded with the Afghan army after the American combat mission ended, and reported on floods and hurricanes in the U.S. She's also reported on research about puppies. Before her work on the Science Desk, she was a producer for NPR's Weekend All Things Considered in Los Angeles.

Hersher was part of the NPR team that won a Peabody award for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, and produced a story from Liberia that won an Edward R. Murrow award for use of sound. She was a finalist for the 2017 Daniel Schorr prize; a 2017 Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting fellow, reporting on sanitation in Haiti; and a 2015 NPR Above the Fray fellow, investigating the causes of the suicide epidemic in Greenland.

Prior to working at NPR, Hersher reported on biomedical research and pharmaceutical news for Nature Medicine.

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A tick grasping a dinosaur feather is preserved in 99 million-year-old amber from Myanmar. Peñalver et al/Nature Communications hide caption

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Peñalver et al/Nature Communications

How 311 Helped Understand Air Pollution After Harvey

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Sales surged for guns, such as these seen at a show in Kenner, La., in late 2012, after the mass shooting in Newtown, Conn. Julie Dermansky/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Julie Dermansky/Corbis via Getty Images

A peregrine falcon in Germany. A new study finds the birds are able to dive at high speeds and catch moving prey using a mathematical principle that also guides missiles. Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images

Grants funded by the National Science Foundation have seen a drop in the use of the phrase "climate change" in public summaries. Katie Park and Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

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Katie Park and Rebecca Hersher/NPR

Climate Scientists Watch Their Words, Hoping To Stave Off Funding Cuts

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A virtual reality program developed by NASA could help scientists visualize the magnetic fields around the earth. NASA hide caption

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NASA

NASA Taps Young People To Help Develop Virtual Reality Technology

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"If I smell something out here, it's bad, and I can tell you during Harvey, it smelled real bad," said Juan Flores in Galena Park, Texas, about a leak that caused strong gasoline odors to waft through town. Frank Bajak/AP hide caption

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Frank Bajak/AP

Slow And Upbeat EPA Response To Hurricane Harvey Pollution Angers Residents

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Shannan Wheeler says he suffered chemical injuries on his arms after a fire broke out at the Arkema chemical plant 3 miles from where he lives. He's now part of a lawsuit against the company. William Chambers for NPR hide caption

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William Chambers for NPR

After Chemical Fires, Texans Worry About Toxic Effects

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Lindsay Cristides, a master's student in oceanography at Texas A&M University, anchors a research vessel in the Houston Ship Channel before taking samples of sediment left behind by Hurricane Harvey floods. The samples will be tested for contaminants including heavy metals. Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Hersher/NPR

Digging In The Mud To See What Toxic Substances Were Spread By Hurricane Harvey

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Young Doctors Were Put To The Test After Vegas Mass Shooting

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Carmen Algeria, a survivor of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, was admitted to Sunrise Hospital. She had been shot in the leg and on Oct. 2 was awaiting surgery. Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images

Patrick Bayou, pictured on Sept. 2, flooded when Hurricane Harvey slammed the Houston area. The bayou is a Superfund toxic waste site. A March cleanup report for the site did not include preparations for more severe flood events as a result of climate change. Jason Dearen/AP hide caption

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Jason Dearen/AP

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists calls the flu vaccine an "essential" part of prenatal care, for protection of the newborn as well as the woman. Infants typically don't get their own flu shot until age 6 months or later. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Pregnant Women Should Still Get The Flu Vaccine, Doctors Advise

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