Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Rebecca Hersher

Allison Shelley/NPR
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Rebecca Hersher

Reporter, Science Desk

Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk, where she reports on outbreaks, natural disasters, and environmental and health research. Since coming to NPR in 2011, she has covered the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, embedded with the Afghan army after the American combat mission ended, and reported on floods and hurricanes in the U.S. She's also reported on research about puppies. Before her work on the Science Desk, she was a producer for NPR's Weekend All Things Considered in Los Angeles.

Hersher was part of the NPR team that won a Peabody award for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, and produced a story from Liberia that won an Edward R. Murrow award for use of sound. She was a finalist for the 2017 Daniel Schorr prize; a 2017 Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting fellow, reporting on sanitation in Haiti; and a 2015 NPR Above the Fray fellow, investigating the causes of the suicide epidemic in Greenland.

Prior to working at NPR, Hersher reported on biomedical research and pharmaceutical news for Nature Medicine.

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Ron Peters gives a tour of the rivers and waterways that run through Ellicott City. Peters installed security cameras around Ellicott City after the 2016 flood to learn more about how flooding in Ellicott City happens. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

The Trump administration has formally notified the United Nations that it is withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement. The move comes as climate change drives more frequent and severe wildfires, hurricanes — such as Hurricane Florence in 2018 — and other hazards. Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg/Getty Images

U.S. Formally Begins To Leave The Paris Climate Agreement

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Can Global Shipping Go Zero Carbon?

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Syrian government troops on Monday moved into towns in northern Syrian formerly controlled by U.S.-backed Kurdish militants. That sets up a potential clash with Turkish forces. Baderkhan Ahmad/AP hide caption

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Baderkhan Ahmad/AP

How A Proposal To Reduce Flood Risk In Ellicott City Nearly Destroyed The Community

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How Climate Change And Flash Flooding Is Affecting Communities Across The Country

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Sea Level Rise, Ocean Warming Is Accelerating According To U.N. Report

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Salmon swim upstream in Seattle in 2017. A mass of abnormally warm water off the west coast of the U.S. that year contributed to a federal fishery disaster. Warming oceans and rising sea levels are threatening coastal economies as the world's climate changes. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Earth's Oceans Are Getting Hotter And Higher, And It's Accelerating

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Climate Liability Lawsuits Could Help With Costs Of Adapting To A Hotter Earth

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A coal-fired power plant in central Poland. Global greenhouse gas emissions rose in 2018, and the world is on track for potentially catastrophic climate change in the coming decades. Czarek Sokolowski/AP hide caption

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Czarek Sokolowski/AP

U.N. Climate Summit Sets Stage For New National Emissions Promises

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What To Expect From The U.N. Climate Action Summit

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Millions of homes built before 1978 still contain lead-based paint. A report published Monday finds the Environmental Protection Agency is not adequately enforcing laws meant to protect children from lead-laden paint flakes and dust. Stew Milne/AP hide caption

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Charleston's Storm Preparations

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