Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Rebecca Hersher

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Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Rebecca Hersher

Reporter, Science Desk

Rebecca Hersher (she/her) is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk, where she reports on outbreaks, natural disasters, and environmental and health research. Since coming to NPR in 2011, she has covered the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, embedded with the Afghan army after the American combat mission ended, and reported on floods and hurricanes in the U.S. She's also reported on research about puppies. Before her work on the Science Desk, she was a producer for NPR's Weekend All Things Considered in Los Angeles.

Hersher was part of the NPR team that won a Peabody award for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, and produced a story from Liberia that won an Edward R. Murrow award for use of sound. She was a finalist for the 2017 Daniel Schorr prize; a 2017 Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting fellow, reporting on sanitation in Haiti; and a 2015 NPR Above the Fray fellow, investigating the causes of the suicide epidemic in Greenland.

Prior to working at NPR, Hersher reported on biomedical research and pharmaceutical news for Nature Medicine.

Story Archive

Part of a destroyed mobile home park is pictured in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers Beach, Florida on September 30, 2022. GIORGIO VIERA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GIORGIO VIERA/AFP via Getty Images

Hurricane Ian left debris in Punta Gorda, Fla., after it made landfall. Storms like Ian are more likely because of climate change. Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images

Climate change makes storms like Ian more common

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Families gather in a playground with a splash pad and swings in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park. Philadelphia has multiple projects underway to make this and other large parks in the city more resilient to heat and other effects of climate change. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

People wait in line for food in Sindh province, Pakistan, on Sept. 19, 2022. The province was one of the hardest hit by recent deadly floods. A new analysis confirms that climate change likely helped cause the disaster. Pervez Masih/AP hide caption

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Pervez Masih/AP

Flooding in Ocean City, N.J. in October 2020. Thousands of coastal cities around the world are already dealing with rising sea levels, and face catastrophic sea level rise if global warming triggers runaway ice melt. Wayne Parry/AP hide caption

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Wayne Parry/AP

Humans must limit warming to avoid climate tipping points, new study finds

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Adapting parks to keep them functional as the climate changes

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City parks can be wild and remote, even if they're in the backyard. Here, early morning hikers rest before walking down Piestewa Peak, one of many mountainous city parks in Phoenix. "There's, like, a 5 million-person city right there. And then you turn out here, and you could be in the high desert," says Claire Miller, a longtime park supervisor in Phoenix. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Do animals sweat? Here's a poem to answer that question

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The new law meant to fix environmental injustices is far from equitable, critics say

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A line of petrochemical facilities in St. Charles Parish, La., in 2018. Many people who live near industrial sites, and who are exposed to dangerous pollution, fear that the Inflation Reduction Act will deepen existing environmental inequalities. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Temperatures in Longyearbyen, Norway above the Arctic Circle hit a new record above 70 degrees Fahrenheit in July 2020. The Arctic has warmed nearly four times faster than the planet as a whole since 1979, a new study finds. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The Arctic is heating up nearly four times faster than the whole planet, study finds

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Heat advisories have been issued throughout central Texas this week. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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