Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Rebecca Hersher

Allison Shelley/NPR
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Rebecca Hersher

Reporter, Science Desk

Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk, where she reports on outbreaks, natural disasters, and environmental and health research. Since coming to NPR in 2011, she has covered the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, embedded with the Afghan army after the American combat mission ended, and reported on floods and hurricanes in the U.S. She's also reported on research about puppies. Before her work on the Science Desk, she was a producer for NPR's Weekend All Things Considered in Los Angeles.

Hersher was part of the NPR team that won a Peabody award for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, and produced a story from Liberia that won an Edward R. Murrow award for use of sound. She was a finalist for the 2017 Daniel Schorr prize; a 2017 Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting fellow, reporting on sanitation in Haiti; and a 2015 NPR Above the Fray fellow, investigating the causes of the suicide epidemic in Greenland.

Prior to working at NPR, Hersher reported on biomedical research and pharmaceutical news for Nature Medicine.

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Three hurricanes form in the Atlantic in September 2018. Forecasters predict three to six major hurricanes during the 2020 season, which is above average. NOAA via AP hide caption

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NOAA via AP

Hurricane Season Will Be Above Average, NOAA Warns

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Daniel Wood/NPR

Traffic Is Way Down Because Of Lockdown, But Air Pollution? Not So Much

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President Trump has not approved FEMA funding for legal help for Americans affected by the coronavirus. Disaster Legal Services are usually available to survivors of disasters. Evan Vucci-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Evan Vucci-Pool/Getty Images

COVID-19 Has Created A Legal Aid Crisis. FEMA's Usual Response Is Missing

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Mental Health Experts Facilitate Talks Between Families, ICU Patients

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People stand in line at a coronavirus testing site in Harlem. In an effort to test more people for the virus, New York and other cities have begun offering door-to-door screening and at-home testing. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

'No One Has Tested Us Before': EMTs Go Door-To-Door With Test Kits

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ICUs Are Changing To Meet The Needs Of The Coronavirus Patients

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Wildfires caused high levels of air pollution in San Francisco in November 2018. Climate change is making wildfires and heat waves more likely, and driving more days of unhealthy air in many U.S. cities. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

New York Lung Doctors Rush To Spread Their Expertise To Other Physicians

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The Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort is treating more than 50 patients from New York City, including 10 critically ill people with COVID-19 who were transferred to the ship from a hospital in Queens on Tuesday. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

An ICU bed at a makeshift, temporary hospital in Manhattan's Central Park East. Throughout New York City, many doctors who usually do plastic surgery or treat children are learning how to monitor people who need to be on ventilators to breathe. Misha Friedman/Getty Images hide caption

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Misha Friedman/Getty Images

New York's Temporary Overflow Hospitals Remain Underused Despite COVID-19 Crisis

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The USNS Comfort hospital ship, which is docked at a Manhattan pier, is adjusting its procedures to accept patients more quickly. The ship is intended to accept non-coronavirus referrals from New York hospitals. Kena Betancur/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/Getty Images

A ventilator and other hospital equipment is seen in an emergency field hospital to aid in the coronavirus pandemic in Central Park in New York City on Tuesday. Misha Friedman/Getty Images hide caption

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Misha Friedman/Getty Images

Tales Of Two Cities: Coronavirus Outcomes Differ Between Bay Area, New York City

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