Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Rebecca Hersher

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Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Rebecca Hersher

Reporter, Science Desk

Rebecca Hersher (she/her) is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk, where she reports on outbreaks, natural disasters, and environmental and health research. Since coming to NPR in 2011, she has covered the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, embedded with the Afghan army after the American combat mission ended, and reported on floods and hurricanes in the U.S. She's also reported on research about puppies. Before her work on the Science Desk, she was a producer for NPR's Weekend All Things Considered in Los Angeles.

Hersher was part of the NPR team that won a Peabody award for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, and produced a story from Liberia that won an Edward R. Murrow award for use of sound. She was a finalist for the 2017 Daniel Schorr prize; a 2017 Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting fellow, reporting on sanitation in Haiti; and a 2015 NPR Above the Fray fellow, investigating the causes of the suicide epidemic in Greenland.

Prior to working at NPR, Hersher reported on biomedical research and pharmaceutical news for Nature Medicine.

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Refrigerators on sale in 2018 in Pennsylvania. The Environmental Protection Agency is planning to phase out the use of cooling chemicals that are powerful greenhouse gases. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Keith Srakocic/AP

Tia Tate is a computational biologist currently working in a postdoctoral position at a federal agency in North Carolina. Cornell Watson for NPR hide caption

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Cornell Watson for NPR

Why Having Diverse Government Scientists Is Key To Dealing With Climate Change

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U.S. President Joe Biden speaks during the virtual Leaders Summit on Climate in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, April 22, 2021. Biden pledged to cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030 as he convenes world leaders in a virtual summit intended to demonstrate renewed American resolve to fight climate change. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

U.S. Renews Its Commitment To Addressing Climate Change

President Biden is hosting dozens of world leaders for a virtual climate summit on Thursday and Friday. The administration is trying to regain ground lost by pulling out of the Paris climate agreement during the Trump administration. The Biden team is promising dramatic cuts in greenhouse gas emissions in the next several decades. Rhitu Chatterjee talks with NPR climate reporters Rebecca Hersher and Lauren Sommer.

U.S. Renews Its Commitment To Addressing Climate Change

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Kaz Fantone/NPR

Is Your Home At Risk From Climate Change? Here's How To Know

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Cars sit on the edge of a sinkhole in the Charles Village neighborhood of Baltimore, Wednesday, April 30, 2014, as heavy rain moves through the region. Roads closed due to flooding, downed trees and electrical lines elsewhere in the Mid-Atlantic. AP hide caption

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AP

Why Baltimore Is Suing Big Oil Over Climate Change

(Encore episode.) Earlier this year, the Supreme Court heard arguments in a case brought by the city of Baltimore against more than a dozen major oil and gas companies including BP, ExxonMobil and Shell. In the lawsuit, BP P.L.C. v. Mayor and City Council of Baltimore, the city government argued that the fossil fuel giants must help pay for the costs of climate change because they knew that their products cause potentially catastrophic global warming. NPR climate reporter Rebecca Hersher has been following the case.

Why Baltimore Is Suing Big Oil Over Climate Change

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Earth's atmosphere photographed from the International Space Station. Greenhouse gases have accumulated rapidly and are trapping extra heat in the atmosphere. It will take decades for the gases to break down naturally or be reabsorbed on Earth's surface. Expedition 28 Crew/International Space Station/NASA hide caption

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Expedition 28 Crew/International Space Station/NASA

Carbon Emissions Could Plummet. The Atmosphere Will Lag Behind

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A portion of Australia's Great Barrier Reef. The Flinders Reef area of the Great Barrier Reef is one of 11 sites around the world where scientists are looking for decisive geological evidence of a new epoch called the Anthropocene. Grant Faint/Getty Images hide caption

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Grant Faint/Getty Images

Debating When The 'Age Of Humans' Began

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A satellite image from September 2017 shows Hurricane Irma, left, and Hurricane Jose, right, in the Atlantic Ocean. NOAA says the average annual number of tropical storms in the Atlantic has slightly increased. NOAA/GOES-16/AP hide caption

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NOAA/GOES-16/AP

A U.S. satellite captures cloud cover over North America on Monday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced it has upgraded its weather forecasting model to use more satellite weather data. GOES-East CONUS/NOAA/NASA hide caption

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GOES-East CONUS/NOAA/NASA

NOAA Upgrades Forecasts As Climate Change Drives More Severe Storms

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A portion of Australia's Great Barrier Reef photographed from the International Space Station. The Flinders Reef area of the Great Barrier Reef is one of 11 sites around the world where scientists are looking for decisive geological evidence of a new epoch called the anthropocene. M. Justin Wilkinson, Texas State U., Jacobs Contract at NASA-JSC/NASA hide caption

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M. Justin Wilkinson, Texas State U., Jacobs Contract at NASA-JSC/NASA

Drawing A Line In The Mud: Scientists Debate When 'Age Of Humans' Began

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Rainelle, W.Va., flooded in June 2016. Research has found that disasters can erode family stability and exacerbate mental and physical ailments when people don't have the money they need to repair their homes. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Millions Of U.S. Homes Face An Expensive Flooding Threat

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Before the flood, Aaron Trigg says, there were baseball games and kids playing on the playground near his house in Rainelle. After the flood, that changed. "Now, it was just silence," he remembers. "It affected the spirit of the town." Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A Looming Disaster: New Data Reveal Where Flood Damage Is An Existential Threat

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Power lines near Houston on Feb. 16. Some Texas residents are facing enormous power bills after wholesale prices for electricity skyrocketed amid last week's massive grid failure. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP