Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Rebecca Hersher

Allison Shelley/NPR
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Rebecca Hersher

Reporter, Science Desk

Rebecca Hersher (she/her) is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk, where she reports on outbreaks, natural disasters, and environmental and health research. Since coming to NPR in 2011, she has covered the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, embedded with the Afghan army after the American combat mission ended, and reported on floods and hurricanes in the U.S. She's also reported on research about puppies. Before her work on the Science Desk, she was a producer for NPR's Weekend All Things Considered in Los Angeles.

Hersher was part of the NPR team that won a Peabody award for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, and produced a story from Liberia that won an Edward R. Murrow award for use of sound. She was a finalist for the 2017 Daniel Schorr prize; a 2017 Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting fellow, reporting on sanitation in Haiti; and a 2015 NPR Above the Fray fellow, investigating the causes of the suicide epidemic in Greenland.

Prior to working at NPR, Hersher reported on biomedical research and pharmaceutical news for Nature Medicine.

Story Archive

Temperatures in Longyearbyen, Norway above the Arctic Circle hit a new record above 70 degrees Fahrenheit in July 2020. The Arctic has warmed nearly four times faster than the planet as a whole since 1979, a new study finds. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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The Arctic is heating up nearly four times faster than the whole planet, study finds

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Heat advisories have been issued throughout central Texas this week. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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High tide flooding in downtown Annapolis, Md., in 2021. The number of days with high tide flooding is accelerating on the East and Gulf coasts. Brian Witte/AP hide caption

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Floods are getting more common. Do you know your risk?

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Because of climate change, inland flooding is becoming more common

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Climate change is making extreme heat around the world more common

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Smoke emerging from chimneys in Skutskär, Sweden. Gerhard Pettersson/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Katherine Morgan wipes sweat from her forehead while walking to work during a record-breaking heat wave in Portland in 2021. Scientists say that heat wave would have been virtually impossible without human caused climate change. Nathan Howard/AP hide caption

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Researchers can now explain how climate change is affecting your weather

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Scientists are learning just how climate change impacts extreme weather events

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The flooding of the Saint John River in 2019 marks the second consecutive year of major flooding. Marc Guitard/Getty Images hide caption

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Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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Carlos and Jessica Deviana sit in the back of their father's SUV, which they were using as a bedroom after Hurricane Michael destroyed their home in Panama City, Fla., in October 2018. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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You've likely been affected by climate change. Your long-term finances might be, too

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How climate change may affect your long-term finances

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Encore: Get ready for another destructive Atlantic hurricane season

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In 2021, Hurricane Ida cut a path of destruction from the Gulf Coast to the Northeast. Vehicles parked in Philadelphia were submerged after the storm brought torrential rain. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Get ready for another destructive Atlantic hurricane season

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Traffic on a hazy evening in Fresno, Calif. A new study estimates that about 50,000 lives could be saved each year if the U.S. eliminated small particles of pollution that are released from the tailpipes of cars and trucks, among other sources. Gary Kazanjian/AP hide caption

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Gary Kazanjian/AP