Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Rebecca Hersher

Allison Shelley/NPR
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Rebecca Hersher

Reporter, Science Desk

Rebecca Hersher (she/her) is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk, where she reports on outbreaks, natural disasters, and environmental and health research. Since coming to NPR in 2011, she has covered the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, embedded with the Afghan army after the American combat mission ended, and reported on floods and hurricanes in the U.S. She's also reported on research about puppies. Before her work on the Science Desk, she was a producer for NPR's Weekend All Things Considered in Los Angeles.

Hersher was part of the NPR team that won a Peabody award for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, and produced a story from Liberia that won an Edward R. Murrow award for use of sound. She was a finalist for the 2017 Daniel Schorr prize; a 2017 Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting fellow, reporting on sanitation in Haiti; and a 2015 NPR Above the Fray fellow, investigating the causes of the suicide epidemic in Greenland.

Prior to working at NPR, Hersher reported on biomedical research and pharmaceutical news for Nature Medicine.

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Before the flood, Aaron Trigg says, there were baseball games and kids playing on the playground near his house in Rainelle. After the flood, that changed. "Now, it was just silence," he remembers. "It affected the spirit of the town." Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A Looming Disaster: New Data Reveal Where Flood Damage Is An Existential Threat

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Power lines near Houston on Feb. 16. Some Texas residents are facing enormous power bills after wholesale prices for electricity skyrocketed amid last week's massive grid failure. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

ENCORE: Why Sea Level Rise Varies Across The World

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In this April 7, 1966 photo, grape strikers on a 300-mile march from Delano, Calif., approach their goal, the Capitol in Sacramento. Walter Zeboski/AP hide caption

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Walter Zeboski/AP

Blue tarps cover houses with damaged roofs in Lake Charles, La., after Hurricane Delta hit the city in October 2020. Bill Feig/AP hide caption

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Bill Feig/AP

Federal Scientists Confirm Virtual Tie For Hottest Year On Record

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Protesters attempt to block the delivery of toxic PCB waste to a landfill in Warren County, N.C., in 1982. It was in response to the state's decision to locate a hazardous waste landfill in a low-income, predominantly Black area of Warren County that the term "environmental racism" was first used by the Rev. Ben Chavis. Jenny Labalme hide caption

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Jenny Labalme

Hope And Skepticism As Biden Promises To Address Environmental Racism

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Cars sit on the edge of a sinkhole in the Charles Village neighborhood of Baltimore, Wednesday, April 30, 2014, as heavy rain moves through the region. Roads closed due to flooding, downed trees and electrical lines elsewhere in the Mid-Atlantic. AP hide caption

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AP

Baltimore Is Suing Big Oil Over Climate Change

The Supreme Court heard arguments this week in a case brought by the city of Baltimore against more than a dozen major oil and gas companies including BP, ExxonMobil and Shell. In the lawsuit, BP P.L.C. v. Mayor and City Council of Baltimore, the city government argues that the fossil fuel giants must help pay for the costs of climate change because they knew that their products cause potentially catastrophic global warming. NPR climate reporter Rebecca Hersher has been following the case.

Baltimore Is Suing Big Oil Over Climate Change

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Baltimore is struggling to pay for the massive infrastructure and public health costs associated with global warming. As in many cities, flood risk has dramatically increased as the Earth has gotten hotter. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Supreme Court Considers Baltimore Suit Against Oil Companies Over Climate Change

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Motorist stop at an intersection where a sign displays the temperature on June 20, 2017 in Phoenix, Arizona. As 2020 comes to a close so does the hottest recorded decade. Ralph Freso/Getty Images hide caption

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Ralph Freso/Getty Images

A pedestrian uses an umbrella to get some relief from the sun as they walk past a sign displaying the temperature on June 20, 2017 in Phoenix, Arizona. As 2020 comes to a close so does the hottest recorded decade. Ralph Freso/Getty Images hide caption

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Ralph Freso/Getty Images

2020 May Be The Hottest Year On Record. Here's The Damage It Did

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Michael Regan currently leads the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality and previously worked on air quality policy at the Environmental Protection Agency. North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality hide caption

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North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality

President-elect Joe Biden is set to name Brenda Mallory to lead his Environmental Quality Council. Stephanie Gross for Southern Environmental Law Center hide caption

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Stephanie Gross for Southern Environmental Law Center

The aftermath of a hurricane in Cameron Parish, La. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Climate Change And 2020's Record-Breaking Hurricane Season

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