Neda Ulaby Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.
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Neda Ulaby

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Doby Photography/NPR

Neda Ulaby

Reporter, Arts Desk

Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.

Scouring the various and often overlapping worlds of art, music, television, film, new media and literature, Ulaby's radio and online stories reflect political and economic realities, cultural issues, obsessions and transitions, as well as artistic adventurousness— and awesomeness.

Over the last few years, Ulaby has strengthened NPR's television coverage both in terms of programming and industry coverage and profiled breakout artists such as Ellen Page and Skylar Grey and behind-the-scenes tastemakers ranging from super producer Timbaland to James Schamus, CEO of Focus Features. Her stories have included a series on women record producers, an investigation into exhibitions of plastinated human bodies, and a look at the legacy of gay activist Harvey Milk. Her profiles have brought listeners into the worlds of such performers as Tyler Perry, Ryan Seacrest, Mark Ruffalo, and Courtney Love.

Ulaby has earned multiple fellowships at the Getty Arts Journalism Program at USC Annenberg as well as a fellowship at the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism to study youth culture. In addition, Ulaby's weekly podcast of NPR's best arts stories. Culturetopia, won a Gracie award from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation.

Joining NPR in 2000, Ulaby was recruited through NPR's Next Generation Radio, and landed a temporary position on the cultural desk as an editorial assistant. She started reporting regularly, augmenting her work with arts coverage for D.C.'s Washington City Paper.

Before coming to NPR, Ulaby worked as managing editor of Chicago's Windy City Times and co-hosted a local radio program, What's Coming Out at the Movies. Her film reviews and academic articles have been published across the country and internationally. For a time, she edited fiction for The Chicago Review and served on the editing staff of the leading academic journal Critical Inquiry. Ulaby taught classes in the humanities at the University of Chicago, Northeastern Illinois University and at high schools serving at-risk students.

A former doctoral student in English literature, Ulaby worked as an intern for the features desk of the Topeka Capital-Journal after graduating from Bryn Mawr College. She was born in Amman, Jordan, and grew up in the idyllic Midwestern college towns of Lawrence, Kansas and Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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Cecilia Chiang poses in her kitchen in 2014. She told NPR that when she first arrived in the U.S., she was shocked by the food most Americans considered to be Chinese. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Cecilia Chiang, Who Revolutionized American Chinese Food, Dies At 100

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Peter Lorre stars in the 1931 film M, which is a great horror entry point for scaredy cats. Herbert Dorfman/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Herbert Dorfman/Corbis via Getty Images

The formerly missing panel is titled, There are combustibles in every State, which a spark might set fire to. --Washington, 26 December 1786, Panel 16, 1956. Anna-Marie Kellen/The Metropolitan Museum of Art hide caption

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Anna-Marie Kellen/The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Akeil Robertson/Philadelphia District Attorney's Office

Artist In Residence Creates Portraits Of Reform At The District Attorney's Office

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Poet Louise Glück Wins 2020 Nobel Prize In Literature

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U.S. Poet Louise Gluck Wins Nobel Prize In Literature

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Literature Prize Will Be The 4th Nobel Announced This Week

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Singer Helen Reddy, Known For 'I Am Woman,' Dies At 78

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Get Well Soon! is an online artwork of more than 200,000 comments from the GoFundMe website. Visit the Get Well Soon! site. Sam Lavigne and Tega Brain hide caption

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Sam Lavigne and Tega Brain

Artists Turn GoFundMe Comments Into A 'Get Well Soon!' Card For A Sick System

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Singer-Songwriter Justin Townes Earle Dies At 38

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This 1895 portrait of Susan B. Anthony was painted by Carl Gutherz when Anthony was president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, a group dedicated to women's voting rights. National Portrait Gallery hide caption

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National Portrait Gallery

Unemployed people gather outside City Hall in Cleveland, Ohio, on Oct. 9, 1930 during the Great Depression. AP hide caption

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AP

Fifty Years After Studs Terkel Published 'Hard Times' ... Here We Are Again

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