Neda Ulaby Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.
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Neda Ulaby

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Doby Photography/NPR

Neda Ulaby

Reporter, Arts Desk

Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.

Scouring the various and often overlapping worlds of art, music, television, film, new media and literature, Ulaby's stories reflect political and economic realities, cultural issues, obsessions and transitions.

A twenty-year veteran of NPR, Ulaby started as a temporary production assistant on the cultural desk, opening mail, booking interviews and cutting tape with razor blades. Over the years, she's also worked as a producer and editor and won a Gracie award from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation for hosting a podcast of NPR's best arts stories.

Ulaby also hosted the Emmy-award winning public television series Arab American Stories in 2012 and earned a 2019 Knight-Wallace Fellowship at the University of Michigan. She's also been chosen for fellowships at the Getty Arts Journalism Program at USC Annenberg and the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism.

Before coming to NPR, Ulaby worked as managing editor of Chicago's Windy City Times and co-hosted a local radio program, What's Coming Out at the Movies. A former doctoral student in English literature, Ulaby has contributed to academic journals and taught classes in the humanities at the University of Chicago, Northeastern Illinois University and at high schools serving at-risk students.

Ulaby worked as an intern for the features desk of the Topeka Capital-Journal after graduating from Bryn Mawr College. But her first appearance in print was when she was only four days old. She was pictured on the front page of the New York Times, as a refugee, when she and her parents were evacuated from Amman, Jordan, during the conflict known as Black September.

Story Archive

Harvey Weinstein and his attorney Mark Werksman at a pre-trial hearing for Weinstein on July 29, 2021. ETIENNE LAURENT/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ETIENNE LAURENT/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

People mourn their ancestors and the deceased at a cemetery in Quanzhou during the traditional Qingming Festival, or "Tomb-sweeping Day." VCG/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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VCG/VCG via Getty Images

LeVar Burton, here in Los Angeles in 2016, told The New York Times that he feels like hosting Jeopardy! "is what I'm supposed to do." This week, he gets his turn at the host lectern left vacant by Alex Trebek, who died last year at age 80. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Author Sarah Ramey's first book was expected to be among 2020's bestsellers. But it was released the same week as the lockdown and got lost amid news of a global catastrophe. Julius Schlosburg hide caption

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Julius Schlosburg

When Your Book Publishes In A Pandemic — Authors Talk About Terrible Timing

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Bette Midler performs during the 91st Annual Academy Awards at Dolby Theatre on Feb. 24, 2019, in Hollywood, Calif. Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Dilip Kumar, Iconic Actor From The 'Golden Age' Of Indian Cinema, Has Died At 98

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Italian singer and TV host Raffaella Carrà being lifted by dancers in a 1983 performance. Mondadori Portfolio/Mondadori via Getty Images hide caption

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Mondadori Portfolio/Mondadori via Getty Images

Raffaella Carrà, Glittery Queen Of Italian TV, Has Died At 78

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Jean Satterfield plays the revolutionary leader of an underground women's army in the 1983 feminist classic Born in Flames. Argenis Apolinario/The Bronx Museum of the Arts hide caption

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Argenis Apolinario/The Bronx Museum of the Arts

This 1983 Feminist Film Was Set In The Dystopian Future, So Basically Right Now

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Running Press

Eat Your Feelings — And Cook Them, Too, With These New Catharsis Cookbooks

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