Neda Ulaby Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.
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Neda Ulaby

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Neda Ulaby

Reporter, Arts Desk

Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.

Scouring the various and often overlapping worlds of art, music, television, film, new media and literature, Ulaby's stories reflect political and economic realities, cultural issues, obsessions and transitions.

A twenty-year veteran of NPR, Ulaby started as a temporary production assistant on the cultural desk, opening mail, booking interviews and cutting tape with razor blades. Over the years, she's also worked as a producer and editor and won a Gracie award from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation for hosting a podcast of NPR's best arts stories.

Ulaby also hosted the Emmy-award winning public television series Arab American Stories in 2012 and earned a 2019 Knight-Wallace Fellowship at the University of Michigan. She's also been chosen for fellowships at the Getty Arts Journalism Program at USC Annenberg and the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism.

Before coming to NPR, Ulaby worked as managing editor of Chicago's Windy City Times and co-hosted a local radio program, What's Coming Out at the Movies. A former doctoral student in English literature, Ulaby has contributed to academic journals and taught classes in the humanities at the University of Chicago, Northeastern Illinois University and at high schools serving at-risk students.

Ulaby worked as an intern for the features desk of the Topeka Capital-Journal after graduating from Bryn Mawr College. But her first appearance in print was when she was only four days old. She was pictured on the front page of the New York Times, as a refugee, when she and her parents were evacuated from Amman, Jordan, during the conflict known as Black September.

Story Archive

The memoir 'Lucky' was about a real rape. The accused is now exonerated

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A panel of the mosaic discovered by a team of archaeologists in England. The researchers say it shows the body of Hector returning to his father, King Priam (right), in exchange for his weight in gold. University of Leicester Archaeological Services hide caption

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University of Leicester Archaeological Services

Mashpee Wampanoag chief reflects on the meaning of Thanksgiving

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Jason Mott is among the winners of the 2021 National Book Awards

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Rachel Brosnahan has received raves for her performance in The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, but comedian Sarah Silverman says it's part of a trend of non-Jews playing emphatically Jewish characters. Nicole Rivelli/Amazon Prime Studios hide caption

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Nicole Rivelli/Amazon Prime Studios

The casting of non-Jewish actors as Jewish characters is causing controversy

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A picture shows the headquarters of publishers Random House in Central London on October 29, 2012 before it merged with Penguin. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP via Getty Images) LEON NEAL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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LEON NEAL/AFP via Getty Images

A 1951 oil painting by Gertrude Abercrombie entitled Search for Rest. Collection of Sandra and Bram Dijkstra. Courtesy of Sandra and Bram Dijk hide caption

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Courtesy of Sandra and Bram Dijk

A midcentury 'jazz witch' artist finds a fandom in the future

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Entrance Gate to Bellevue Hospital in New York City Education Images/Education Images/Universal Image hide caption

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Education Images/Education Images/Universal Image

How metaphors and stories are integral to science and healing

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Alec Baldwin fires prop gun on movie set killing a film crew member

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Children's book illustrator Jerry Pinkney poses in front of two of his illustrations in 2016, at the City Hall in Philadelphia. Dake Kang/AP hide caption

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Dake Kang/AP