Neda Ulaby Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.
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Neda Ulaby

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Doby Photography/NPR

Neda Ulaby

Reporter, Arts Desk

Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.

Scouring the various and often overlapping worlds of art, music, television, film, new media and literature, Ulaby's stories reflect political and economic realities, cultural issues, obsessions and transitions.

A twenty-year veteran of NPR, Ulaby started as a temporary production assistant on the cultural desk, opening mail, booking interviews and cutting tape with razor blades. Over the years, she's also worked as a producer and editor and won a Gracie award from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation for hosting a podcast of NPR's best arts stories.

Ulaby also hosted the Emmy-award winning public television series Arab American Stories in 2012 and earned a 2019 Knight-Wallace Fellowship at the University of Michigan. She's also been chosen for fellowships at the Getty Arts Journalism Program at USC Annenberg and the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism.

Before coming to NPR, Ulaby worked as managing editor of Chicago's Windy City Times and co-hosted a local radio program, What's Coming Out at the Movies. A former doctoral student in English literature, Ulaby has contributed to academic journals and taught classes in the humanities at the University of Chicago, Northeastern Illinois University and at high schools serving at-risk students.

Ulaby worked as an intern for the features desk of the Topeka Capital-Journal after graduating from Bryn Mawr College. But her first appearance in print was when she was only four days old. She was pictured on the front page of the New York Times, as a refugee, when she and her parents were evacuated from Amman, Jordan, during the conflict known as Black September.

Story Archive

Saturday

The Wife of Bath from The Ellesmere Manuscript, one of the earliest manuscripts of Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. The Huntington Library hide caption

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The Huntington Library

A Wife of Bath 'biography' brings a modern woman out of the Middle Ages

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Tuesday

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Monday

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Thursday

Underage stars of the 1968 version of 'Romeo & Juliet' sue over nude scene

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Friday

Nikki Grimes, the winner of the ALA Coretta Scott King - Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement, has written more than 100 children's books. Aaron Lemen/Astra Young Readers hide caption

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Aaron Lemen/Astra Young Readers

2022 was a good year for Nikki Grimes, who just published her 103rd book

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Wednesday

Friday

Does some art deserve to be attacked by climate activists?

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Thursday

Alexis Louder and David Harbour star in Violent Night. Allen Fraser/Universal Pictures hide caption

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Allen Fraser/Universal Pictures

Wednesday

Wednesday

A general View of Bellevue Hospital in October, 2014. Kena Betancur / Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur / Getty Images

Arts Week: The Literary Magazine Dissecting Health And Healing

New York's Bellevue Hospital is the oldest public hospital in the country, serving patients from all walks of life. It's also the home of a literary magazine, the Bellevue Literary Review, which is now more than 20 years old. In today's encore episode, NPR arts correspondent Neda Ulaby tells Emily how one doctor at Bellevue Hospital decided a literary magazine is essential to both science and healing.

Arts Week: The Literary Magazine Dissecting Health And Healing

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