Neda Ulaby Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.
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Neda Ulaby

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Neda Ulaby

Reporter, Arts Desk

Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.

Scouring the various and often overlapping worlds of art, music, television, film, new media and literature, Ulaby's radio and online stories reflect political and economic realities, cultural issues, obsessions and transitions, as well as artistic adventurousness— and awesomeness.

Over the last few years, Ulaby has strengthened NPR's television coverage both in terms of programming and industry coverage and profiled breakout artists such as Ellen Page and Skylar Grey and behind-the-scenes tastemakers ranging from super producer Timbaland to James Schamus, CEO of Focus Features. Her stories have included a series on women record producers, an investigation into exhibitions of plastinated human bodies, and a look at the legacy of gay activist Harvey Milk. Her profiles have brought listeners into the worlds of such performers as Tyler Perry, Ryan Seacrest, Mark Ruffalo, and Courtney Love.

Ulaby has earned multiple fellowships at the Getty Arts Journalism Program at USC Annenberg as well as a fellowship at the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism to study youth culture. In addition, Ulaby's weekly podcast of NPR's best arts stories. Culturetopia, won a Gracie award from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation.

Joining NPR in 2000, Ulaby was recruited through NPR's Next Generation Radio, and landed a temporary position on the cultural desk as an editorial assistant. She started reporting regularly, augmenting her work with arts coverage for D.C.'s Washington City Paper.

Before coming to NPR, Ulaby worked as managing editor of Chicago's Windy City Times and co-hosted a local radio program, What's Coming Out at the Movies. Her film reviews and academic articles have been published across the country and internationally. For a time, she edited fiction for The Chicago Review and served on the editing staff of the leading academic journal Critical Inquiry. Ulaby taught classes in the humanities at the University of Chicago, Northeastern Illinois University and at high schools serving at-risk students.

A former doctoral student in English literature, Ulaby worked as an intern for the features desk of the Topeka Capital-Journal after graduating from Bryn Mawr College. She was born in Amman, Jordan, and grew up in the idyllic Midwestern college towns of Lawrence, Kansas and Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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Artist Ekene Ijeoma on the set of "Deconstructed Anthems" at Houston's Day For Night Festival in 2017. Katrina Barber /Resnicow and Associates hide caption

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Katrina Barber /Resnicow and Associates

This Audio Portrait Of The 2020 Census Asks: Whose Voices Really Count?

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A quarantine seance performed over Zoom goes awry in the new horror movie 'Host,' streaming now on Shudder. Shudder hide caption

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Shudder

New 'Quar-Horror' Films Show Staying At Home Is Scary Too

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The Annenberg Space for Photography closed permanently in June. In a survey of museum directors, 33% said there was either a "significant risk" of closing permanently or that they didn't know if their institutions would survive. Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Annenberg Space for Photography hide caption

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Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Annenberg Space for Photography

Buyers in the early days of the pandemic emptied grocery store shelves of beans and legumes. Those in the throes of "bean remorse" are trying to figure out how to put their stockpiles to use. Matthew Mead/AP hide caption

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Matthew Mead/AP

Sourdough Is A Social Media Star — But Those Beans Would Look Great On Instagram

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Naya Rivera at the 2019 Women's Guild Cedars-Sinai annual luncheon in Beverly Hills, Calif. David Livingston/Getty Images hide caption

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David Livingston/Getty Images

'Glee' Actor Naya Rivera's Death Ruled Accidental Drowning

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A life-sized dinosaur family wearing masks bursts from the walls of The Children's Museum of Indianapolis, the largest children's museum in the world. The Children's Museum of Indianapolis hide caption

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The Children's Museum of Indianapolis

So Much For 'Please Touch,' After COVID-19, Kids' Museums Will Be Less Hands-On

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Writer and activist Larry Kramer, here in 1989, was an unapologetically loud and irrepressible voice in the fight against AIDS. Sara Krulwich/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara Krulwich/Getty Images

Larry Kramer, Pioneering AIDS Activist And Writer, Dies At 84

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How New Deal Art Redefined America

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Boris Deutch painted this 1941 Works Progress Administration mural in the Terminal Annex building in Los Angeles, Calif. Carol M. Highsmith/The Jon B. Lovelace Collection of California Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith's America Project, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division hide caption

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Carol M. Highsmith/The Jon B. Lovelace Collection of California Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith's America Project, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division