Neda Ulaby Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.
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Neda Ulaby

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Neda Ulaby

Reporter, Arts Desk

Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.

Scouring the various and often overlapping worlds of art, music, television, film, new media and literature, Ulaby's radio and online stories reflect political and economic realities, cultural issues, obsessions and transitions, as well as artistic adventurousness— and awesomeness.

Over the last few years, Ulaby has strengthened NPR's television coverage both in terms of programming and industry coverage and profiled breakout artists such as Ellen Page and Skylar Grey and behind-the-scenes tastemakers ranging from super producer Timbaland to James Schamus, CEO of Focus Features. Her stories have included a series on women record producers, an investigation into exhibitions of plastinated human bodies, and a look at the legacy of gay activist Harvey Milk. Her profiles have brought listeners into the worlds of such performers as Tyler Perry, Ryan Seacrest, Mark Ruffalo, and Courtney Love.

Ulaby has earned multiple fellowships at the Getty Arts Journalism Program at USC Annenberg as well as a fellowship at the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism to study youth culture. In addition, Ulaby's weekly podcast of NPR's best arts stories. Culturetopia, won a Gracie award from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation.

Joining NPR in 2000, Ulaby was recruited through NPR's Next Generation Radio, and landed a temporary position on the cultural desk as an editorial assistant. She started reporting regularly, augmenting her work with arts coverage for D.C.'s Washington City Paper.

Before coming to NPR, Ulaby worked as managing editor of Chicago's Windy City Times and co-hosted a local radio program, What's Coming Out at the Movies. Her film reviews and academic articles have been published across the country and internationally. For a time, she edited fiction for The Chicago Review and served on the editing staff of the leading academic journal Critical Inquiry. Ulaby taught classes in the humanities at the University of Chicago, Northeastern Illinois University and at high schools serving at-risk students.

A former doctoral student in English literature, Ulaby worked as an intern for the features desk of the Topeka Capital-Journal after graduating from Bryn Mawr College. She was born in Amman, Jordan, and grew up in the idyllic Midwestern college towns of Lawrence, Kansas and Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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What To Stream If You Find Yourself Stuck At Home

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Dr. Dre's The Chronic was one of this year's 25 additions to the Library of Congress' National Recording Registry, alongside the theme song to Mister Rogers' Neighborhood and music by Tina Turner. Mike Coppola/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Coppola/Getty Images

Elisabeth Moss stars as Cecilia Kass in The Invisible Man, written and directed by Leigh Whannell. Universal Pictures hide caption

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Universal Pictures

The "Hearts of Our People" exhibition is devoted entirely to the art of Native American women past and present. Above, Náhookǫsjí Hai (Winter in the North)/Biboon Giiwedinong (It Is Winter in the North) by D.Y. Begay (Navajo), 2018, wool and natural dyes. Addison Doty/Minneapolis Institute of Art hide caption

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Addison Doty/Minneapolis Institute of Art

'Making Is About Our Survival': Exhibition Celebrates Artwork Of Native Women

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The School of Economics Building at the Universita Luigi Bocconi in Milan, Italy, was designed by Grafton Architects — founded by Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara. It launched Grafton Architects as a leading designer of university buildings. Federico Brunetti/Pritzker Architecture Prize hide caption

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Federico Brunetti/Pritzker Architecture Prize

For The 1st Time, Architecture's Most Prestigious Prize Is Awarded To 2 Women

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The Fleeting Flavor Of Philadelphia's Fat Tuesday Fastnacht Donuts

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It's National Marimba Day In Guatemala — And For Guatemalans In The U.S.

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The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology — known as The Penn Museum — has hired refugees and immigrants from the Middle East, Africa and Central America as part of their "Global Guides" program. Moumena Saradar, who is originally from Syria, stands next to the wedding jewelry and headdress of Queen Puabi, her favorite part of the Middle East gallery. Cameron Pollack for NPR hide caption

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Cameron Pollack for NPR

Refugee Docents Help Bring A Museum's Global Collection To Life

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Today's stories about disease — like The Walking Dead with its zombies — tend to be rooted in political and social realities. AMC hide caption

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AMC

What Fictional Pandemics Can Teach Us About Real-World Survival

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Set during the first World War, 1917 was made to look like it was filmed in a single shot. "It operates more like a ticking-clock thriller," says director Sam Mendes. François Duhamel /Universal Pictures hide caption

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François Duhamel /Universal Pictures

The Rise Of The Single-Shot Movie In A Hyper-Edited World

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Does Netflix's 'The Circle' Count As An Epistolary Drama?

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Destin Daniel Cretton co-wrote and directed the film adaptation of Bryan Stevenson's book Just Mercy. He's now working on Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings — the first Marvel Studios movie centered on an Asian superhero. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Director Of 'Just Mercy' Depicts Characters 'In All Of Their Complexities'

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NPR's Book Concierge offers 350+ new books handpicked by NPR staff and critics — including Neda Ulaby. Click here to find your next great read. NPR hide caption

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Memoir Chronicles The 'Wild And Precious Life' Of Activist Edie Windsor

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