Neda Ulaby Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.
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Neda Ulaby

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Neda Ulaby

Reporter, Arts Desk

Neda Ulaby reports on arts, entertainment, and cultural trends for NPR's Arts Desk.

Scouring the various and often overlapping worlds of art, music, television, film, new media and literature, Ulaby's stories reflect political and economic realities, cultural issues, obsessions and transitions.

A twenty-year veteran of NPR, Ulaby started as a temporary production assistant on the cultural desk, opening mail, booking interviews and cutting tape with razor blades. Over the years, she's also worked as a producer and editor and won a Gracie award from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation for hosting a podcast of NPR's best arts stories.

Ulaby also hosted the Emmy-award winning public television series Arab American Stories in 2012 and earned a 2019 Knight-Wallace Fellowship at the University of Michigan. She's also been chosen for fellowships at the Getty Arts Journalism Program at USC Annenberg and the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism.

Before coming to NPR, Ulaby worked as managing editor of Chicago's Windy City Times and co-hosted a local radio program, What's Coming Out at the Movies. A former doctoral student in English literature, Ulaby has contributed to academic journals and taught classes in the humanities at the University of Chicago, Northeastern Illinois University and at high schools serving at-risk students.

Ulaby worked as an intern for the features desk of the Topeka Capital-Journal after graduating from Bryn Mawr College. But her first appearance in print was when she was only four days old. She was pictured on the front page of the New York Times, as a refugee, when she and her parents were evacuated from Amman, Jordan, during the conflict known as Black September.

Story Archive

Books We Love: 3 recommendations for a non-fiction read

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Olivia Newton-John arrives for G'Day USA's Los Angeles Black Tie Gala January 27, 2018. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

1980s pop goddess Olivia Newton-John has died at age 73

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Historian David McCullough, shown here in 2013, has died at 89. He wrote extensively and compellingly about American history and won two Pulitzer Prizes. Matthew J. Lee/Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew J. Lee/Boston Globe/Getty Images

Pulitzer Prize winning historian David McCullough has died

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Artist Tunde Olaniran Steven Piper/Tunde Olaniran hide caption

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Steven Piper/Tunde Olaniran

Artist Tunde Olaniran's 'Made a Universe' opens a portal at a Detroit museum

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Encore: After nearly 50 years, PFLAG says it still has a long way to go

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(From left) Amy Grant, Gladys Knight, George Clooney and Tania León are four of the performing artists honored for a lifetime of achievement by the Kennedy Center this year. The Kennedy Center hide caption

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The Kennedy Center

Dorcas Sowunmi and Mary Badham on the national tour of To Kill A Mockingbird. Julieta Cervantes/The first national tour of 'To Kill a Mockingbird' hide caption

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Julieta Cervantes/The first national tour of 'To Kill a Mockingbird'

Scout from the 'To Kill A Mockingbird' film now plays the racist neighbor onstage

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Ten of the top cookbooks of 2022, so far

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James Caan on the set of the 1975 film Rollerball. John Downing/Getty Images hide caption

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John Downing/Getty Images

James Caan, an onscreen tough guy and movie craftsman, has died at 82

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Vijay Gupta performing with some of the professional musicians in Street Symphony at the Midnight Mission on LA's Skid Row. David Zimmerman hide caption

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David Zimmerman

Street Symphony plays in harmony with Skid Row's 'sacred spaces'

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The Peanuts characters reminded readers of the importance of Title IX at a moment when many schools and athletic programs were resistant to it. Peanuts © 1979 Peanuts Worldwide LLC hide caption

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Peanuts © 1979 Peanuts Worldwide LLC

'Peanuts,' one of the world's most popular cartoons, pushed for Title IX in the 1970s

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PFLAG En Español members celebrate Pride in Los Angeles. PFLAG hide caption

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PFLAG

50 years ago, PFLAG's founder marched with her gay son. How's it keeping up in 2022?

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