Scott Simon Scott Simon is a Peabody Award-winning correspondent and host of NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday.
Scott Simon
Stories By

Scott Simon

Scott Simon
Will O'Leary/N/A

Scott Simon

Host, Weekend Edition Saturday

Scott Simon is one of America's most admired writers and broadcasters. He has reported from all fifty states, five continents, and ten wars, from El Salvador to Sarajevo to Afghanistan and Iraq. His books have chronicled character and characters, in war and peace, sports and art, tragedy and comedy.

Simon's weekly show, Weekend Edition Saturday, has been called by the Washington Post, "the most literate, witty, moving, and just plain interesting news show on any dial," and by Brett Martin of Time-Out New York "the most eclectic, intelligent two hours of broadcasting on the airwaves." He has won every major award in broadcasting, including the Peabody, the Emmy, the Columbia-DuPont, the Ohio State Award, the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, and the Sidney Hillman Award. Simon received the Presidential End Hunger Award for his coverage of the Ethiopian civil war and famine, and a special citation from the Peabody Awards for his weekly essays, which were cited as "consistently thoughtful, graceful, and challenging." He has also received the Barry M. Goldwater Award from the Human Rights Fund. Recently, he was awarded the Studs Terkel Award.

Simon has hosted many television specials, including the PBS's "State of Mind," "Voices of Vision," and "Need to Know." "The Paterson Project" won a national Emmy, as did his two-hour special from the Rio earth summit meeting. He co-anchored PBS's "Millennium 2000" coverage in concert with the BBC, and has co-hosted the televised Columbia-DuPont Awards. He also became familiar to viewers in Great Britain as host of the continuing BBC series, "Eyewitness," and a special on the White House press corps. He has appeared as a guest and commentator on all major networks, including BBC, NBC, CNN, and ESPN.

Simon has contributed articles to The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times Book Review, The Wall Street Journal, The Sunday Times of London, The Guardian, and Gourmet among other publications, and won a James Beard Award for his story, "Conflict Cuisine" in Gourmet. He has received numerous honorary degrees.

Sports Illustrated called his book Home and Away: Memoir of a Fan "extraordinary...uniformly superb...a memoir of such breadth and reach that it compares favorably with Fredrick Exley's A Fan's Notes." It was at the top of several non-fiction bestseller lists. His book, and Jackie Robinson and the Integration of Baseball, was Barnes and Nobles' Sports Book of the Year. His novel, Pretty Birds, the story of two teenage girls in Sarajevo during the siege, received rave reviews, Scott Turow calling it, "the most auspicious fiction debut by a journalist of note since Tom Wolfe's. . . always gripping, always tender, and often painfully funny. It is a marvel of technical finesse, close observation, and a perfectly pitched heart." Windy City, Simon's second novel, is a political comedy set in the Chicago City Council. Baby, We Were Meant for Each Other, an essay about the joys of adoption, was published in August 2010.

Simon's tweets to his 1.25 million Twitter followers from his mother's bedside in the summer of 2013 gathered major media attention around the world. He is completing a book on their last week together that will appear in time for Mother's Day 2015.

Simon is a native of Chicago and the son of comedian Ernie Simon and Patricia Lyons Simon. His hobbies are books, theater, ballet, British comedy, Mexican cooking and "bleeding for the Chicago Cubs." He appeared as Mother Ginger in the Ballet Austin production of The Nutcracker.

More from Scott Simon

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Andrea Mantegna's "Madonna della Vittoria," housed in the Louvre in Paris, includes a depiction of Adam, Eve and those tempting apples. Christophel Fine Art/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christophel Fine Art/UIG via Getty Images

Opinion: Satanic Display Shows Power Of The Bible

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/674772332/674918690" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"I think what makes a song good is, for a listener, there always has to be something new happening," Benny Blanco says. Matt Adam/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Adam/Courtesy of the artist

The Continuous Work Ethic Of Benny Blanco

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/673739072/674918709" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Anna and the Apocalypse, Ella Hunt plays the titular teenager Anna, who fends off a zombie invasion in song. Gerardo Jaconelli/Orion Pictures hide caption

toggle caption
Gerardo Jaconelli/Orion Pictures

'Anna And The Apocalypse': The Scottish Zombie Christmas High School Musical

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/674650604/674918715" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Holstein Friesian are a breed of dairy cattle and this week, one of those cattle made big news for its size. Not pictured here. Mike Kemp/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Kemp/Getty Images

Opinion: Knickers, The Giant Steer That Stole The Internet

Audio for this story is unavailable.

Jeff Tweedy's WARM is out now via dBpm Records. Whitten Sabbatini/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Whitten Sabbatini/Courtesy of the artist

On 'Warm,' Jeff Tweedy Confronts His Shadow Self

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/671871636/672511729" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The shooting at Mercy Hospital & Medical Center took the lives of three people. One of them was a physician at the hospital. Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images

Opinion: Remembering A Victim of the Mercy Hospital Shooting

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/670466930/670513685" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"I think it's important to really understand where you're coming from, understand who your peers are, who your community is," DACA recipient and future Rhodes Scholar Jin Park says. Stephanie B. Mitchell/Harvard University hide caption

toggle caption
Stephanie B. Mitchell/Harvard University

Meet Jin Park, The First DACA Recipient Awarded A Rhodes Scholarship

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/670513643/670513644" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michael Douglas (right) plays an aging actor and acting coach in The Kominsky Method. Alan Arkin is his longtime agent. Mike Yarish/Netflix hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Yarish/Netflix

Behind 'The Kominsky Method,' A Sitcom King (He Prefers 'Court Jester')

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/668744321/668856533" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As some ballet shoe companies have begun to introduce darker shades to include women of color, Marie Astrid Mence, junior artist with Balle Black, is excited for ballet's future generations of dancers who will get to grow up with shoe colors that fit their complexion. Photography by ASH hide caption

toggle caption
Photography by ASH

Ballet Dancers Of Color Welcome New Hues As Major Shoe Supplier Diversifies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/666492913/666492914" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scott Simon, Not The Minnesota Secretary Of State

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/666492822/666492823" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Facebook released a report this week about how the social media company's platform has been used to incite violence against the Rohingya Muslims. Ziaul Haque /Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ziaul Haque /Getty Images

Opinion: Facebook's Link To The Rohingya Muslims

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/666414249/666492920" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Soho Press

An American And Her Filipina Translator Exhume A Massacre In 'Insurrecto'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/666360732/666492938" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pew Research Center Says Half Of Adults Use YouTube To Learn New Things

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/666492836/666492837" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript