Domenico Montanaro Domenico Montanaro is NPR's lead editor for politics and digital audience.
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
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Domenico Montanaro

Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Domenico Montanaro

Lead Editor, Politics & Digital Audience

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's lead editor for politics and digital audience. Based in Washington, D.C., he directs political coverage across the network's broadcast and digital platforms.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and taught high school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in Journalism from Columbia University.

A native of Queens, NY, Montanaro is a die-hard Mets fan and college basketball junkie.

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Story Archive

In Fight With 'Chuck And Nancy,' Trump Says He'd Be 'Proud' To Shut Down Government

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More Americans would prefer that President Trump compromise on funding for his border wall rather than risk a government shutdown, a new poll finds. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Planned Parenthood opened its new headquarters in Washington, D.C., in September. The Supreme Court declined to take up a key case, a big win for the organization. Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, pictured above at a 2011 fundraiser, announced this week he would not seek the presidency. "The process is cruel," he said. Mandell Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandell Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump speaks to reporters before departing the White House for California in November. Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool/Getty Images

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, December 6

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House Republicans Hacked + Voter Fraud Allegations In North Carolina

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How The Republican Party Changed During George H.W. Bush's Presidency

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President George H.W. Bush and Russian President Boris Yeltsin toast to each other after signing an arms control treaty in January 1993 in Moscow. Bush skillfully cultivated relationships with both Yeltsin and his Soviet predecessor, Mikhail Gorbachev. David Ake/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David Ake/AFP/Getty Images

House Democrats Nominate Pelosi For Speaker; Republicans Win Final Senate Seat

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Election Update + Turkey Traditions

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This turkey seemed to be in a fowl mood in 1987 when President Ronald Reagan used the word "pardon" for the first time in reference to sparing a Thanksgiving turkey. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

CNN attorney Ted Boutrous delivers remarks outside U.S. District Court following a hearing Wednesday on CNN's case against the White House for stripping a reporter of his press pass. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Judge Rules In Favor Of CNN, Temporarily Restores Correspondent's Credential

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Weekly Roundup: Thursday, November 15

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