Domenico Montanaro Domenico Montanaro is a senior political editor/correspondent for the Washington Desk
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
Stories By

Domenico Montanaro

Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Domenico Montanaro

Senior Political Editor/Correspondent, Washington Desk

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's senior political editor/correspondent. Based in Washington, D.C., his work appears on air and online delivering analysis of the political climate in Washington and campaigns. He also helps edit political coverage.

Montanaro joined NPR in 2015 and oversaw coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign, including for broadcast and digital.

Before joining NPR, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and taught high school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a life-long Mets fan and college basketball junkie.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Some Battleground States Lean Toward Biden, According To A New NPR Analysis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/898674864/898674867" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Voters cast their ballots at a polling place at Cromie Elementary School in Warren, Mich., in March. Warren is in Macomb County, considered a critical suburb in the presidential election. Elaine Cromie/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Elaine Cromie/Getty Images

President Trump is having to face the reality that his approach to the coronavirus crisis has hurt him politically. This week he decided to change course, at least for now. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Trump Warns Coronavirus Crisis Will Get Worse Before It Gets Better

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/894074623/894074630" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lawmakers return to the Capitol on Monday. On Saturday, the flag was lowered to half staff to honor the life of Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., who died late Friday. Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images

"Cases are up because we have the best testing in the world," President Trump said in an interview that aired Sunday. "I'm glad we do [testing], but it really skews the numbers." In fact, cases are rising at a faster rate than tests. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Polls Show Biden Riding High. Democrats Are Still Worried.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/891576470/891596068" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript