Domenico Montanaro Domenico Montanaro is a senior political editor/correspondent for the Washington Desk
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
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Domenico Montanaro

Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Domenico Montanaro

Senior Political Editor/Correspondent, Washington Desk

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's senior political editor/correspondent. Based in Washington, D.C., his work appears on air and online delivering analysis of the political climate in Washington and campaigns. He also helps edit political coverage.

Montanaro joined NPR in 2015 and oversaw coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign, including for broadcast and digital.

Before joining NPR, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and taught high school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a life-long Mets fan and college basketball junkie.

Story Archive

Voting rights activist Stacey Abrams speaks during an Oct. 17 rally in Norfolk supporting Terry McAuliffe in his bid to reclaim the Virginia governor's office. To drum up enthusiasm, Democrats have brought in some of their biggest names. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Are School Board Officials Getting Death Threats?

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Politics chat: Biden's spending bills are still stalled on Capitol Hill

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A man works on the roof of a storm-damaged house on Sept. 4 after Hurricane Ida swept through Grand Isle, La. A new poll finds that two-thirds of Americans say if their home is hit by an extreme weather event they'd rather rebuild than relocate. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Abortion-rights activists rally at the Texas Capitol in Austin on Sept. 11 in opposition to the state's restrictive new abortion law. Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images hide caption

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President Biden has seen his approval rating tick back up some after last month's low, with 45% now approving and 46% disapproving. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a No on the Recall campaign event with Vice President Harris on Wednesday in San Leandro, Calif. President Biden is set to campaign with Newsom on Monday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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There's A Chance That California Will Soon Have A Republican Governor

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The U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, which saw scenes of desperation and violence inside and outside of Kabul's airport, has coincided with a drop in President Biden's approval rating. Biden has fiercely defended the evacuation. Taylor Crul/U.S. Air Force via Getty Images hide caption

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Taylor Crul/U.S. Air Force via Getty Images