Domenico Montanaro Domenico Montanaro is a senior political editor/correspondent for the Washington Desk
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
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Domenico Montanaro

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Domenico Montanaro - 2015
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Domenico Montanaro

Senior Political Editor/Correspondent, Washington Desk

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's senior political editor/correspondent. Based in Washington, D.C., his work appears on air and online delivering analysis of the political climate in Washington and campaigns. He also helps edit political coverage.

Montanaro joined NPR in 2015 and oversaw coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign, including for broadcast and digital.

Before joining NPR, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and taught high school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a life-long Mets fan and college basketball junkie.

Story Archive

As Biden marks 1 year in office, he'll hold a news conference

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President Biden acknowledged his administration's recent struggles Friday while speaking about the bipartisan infrastructure bill he signed into law last year. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Biden's bad week and the unreality of great expectations

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Then-candidate Joe Biden walks on stage to begin the first presidential debate in September 2020. The 2020 faceoffs may be the last of their kind. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Republicans threaten to skip traditional general election debates

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Former President Donald Trump at a rally in Phoenix, Ariz., on July 24, 2021. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Pressed on his election lies, former President Trump cuts NPR interview short

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The Supreme Court Weighs Vaccines Mandates

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., pauses for a moment of silence alongside fellow lawmakers and congressional staff members during a vigil Thursday evening to commemorate the anniversary of the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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The immovable Republican Party and 'ink-blot politics'

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Toward the end of 2021, President Biden's approval ratings took a dive. Two things in particular need to improve for Biden to make a turnaround — the pandemic needs to lessen and price increases need to let up. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

A pro-Trump mob gathers in front of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 in an effort to disrupt the ratification of Joe Biden's Electoral College victory. So far, more than 700 people have been charged with crimes due to their actions that day. Brent Stirton/Getty Images hide caption

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Biden struggles with political agenda and COVID-19, new NPR poll shows

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President Biden traveled to Kansas City, Mo., Wednesday to talk about how the newly signed infrastructure law will boost the community. As Biden sells his agenda, a new NPR/Marist poll finds his approval rating stuck at 42%. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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A new poll finds major warning signs for Biden and fellow Democrats

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