Domenico Montanaro Domenico Montanaro is a senior political editor/correspondent for the Washington Desk
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
Stories By

Domenico Montanaro

Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Domenico Montanaro

Senior Political Editor/Correspondent, Washington Desk

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's senior political editor/correspondent. Based in Washington, D.C., his work appears on air and online delivering analysis of the political climate in Washington and campaigns. He also helps edit political coverage.

Montanaro joined NPR in 2015 and oversaw coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign, including for broadcast and digital.

Before joining NPR, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and taught high school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a life-long Mets fan and college basketball junkie.

Story Archive

Republicans aim to paint all Democrats as radicals when it comes to abortion

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1097820843/1097820844" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Democratic Senate nominee Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio landed in the line of conservative fire over his comments on abortion rights. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Abortion rights and anti-abortion activists demonstrate in front of the Supreme Court on Tuesday. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Voters in 13 states head to the polls in May — starting with Ohio and Indiana

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1096075571/1096075572" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former President Donald Trump listens as J.D. Vance, a Republican candidate for U.S. Senate in Ohio, speaks during a rally hosted by Trump on April 23 in Delaware, Ohio. Trump had announced his endorsement of Vance in the Republican primary the week before. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Politics chat: Biden's ratings down over Ukraine; midterms begin in Indiana and Ohio

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1095809160/1095809161" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Republicans are favored to take back the House in November's midterm elections, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll. Here, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., arrives for a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on March 18. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

After Decades Of Bipartisan Teamwork, Republicans Quit Presidential Debate Commission

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1093375687/1093386810" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The RNC is severing ties with the nonprofit that runs presidential debates

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1093006012/1093006013" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Look At The Most Interesting Races In The GOP's Fight To Retake The Senate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1092677939/1092690384" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Incumbent Sens. (from left) Raphael Warnock, D-Ga., Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nev., and Ron Johnson, R-Wis., are all facing tough reelection contests this year. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images; Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images; STR/NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images; Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images; STR/NurPhoto/Getty Images

The top 10 Senate seats that are most likely to flip to the other party

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1091483542/1092117591" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript