Domenico Montanaro Domenico Montanaro is a senior political editor/correspondent for the Washington Desk
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
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Domenico Montanaro

Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Domenico Montanaro

Senior Political Editor/Correspondent, Washington Desk

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's senior political editor/correspondent. Based in Washington, D.C., his work appears on air and online delivering analysis of the political climate in Washington and campaigns. He also helps edit political coverage.

Montanaro joined NPR in 2015 and oversaw coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign, including for broadcast and digital.

Before joining NPR, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and taught high school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a life-long Mets fan and college basketball junkie.

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House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., makes a short statement after his committee approved two articles of impeachment against President Trump Friday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Amid Impeachment, A Flurry Of Bipartisan Deals

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House Judiciary Committee ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., stands up as the committee abruptly adjourns without votes on the articles of impeachment against President Trump. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

House Speaker of the Nancy Pelosi joins House investigative committee chairs as they announce articles of impeachment against President Trump Tuesday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Impeachment To Trade, Moderate Democrats Are In The Driver's Seat

House Democrats officially unveiled two articles of impeachment against President Trump at a press conference on Tuesday morning: abuse of power in the Ukraine affair and obstruction of Congress. The scope of the charges, which make only a passing reference to special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference, reveals the sway of Democrats' moderate members in shaping the impeachment process.

Impeachment To Trade, Moderate Democrats Are In The Driver's Seat

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House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., speaks with ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga., at Monday's impeachment hearing. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Impeachable offenses were listed on a monitor as the House Judiciary Committee listened to testimony by constitutional scholars earlier this week. Saul Loeb/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/Pool/Getty Images

News Brief: Impeachment Hearings, View From Ukraine, France General Strike

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Two male turkeys from North Carolina named Bread and Butter hang out in their hotel room at the Willard InterContinental Hotel in Washington, D.C., ahead of Tuesday's pardoning. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

President Trump Pardons Pair Of Turkeys — The Strange Truth Behind The Tradition

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