Domenico Montanaro Domenico Montanaro is a senior political editor/correspondent for the Washington Desk
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
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Domenico Montanaro

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Domenico Montanaro - 2015
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Domenico Montanaro

Senior Political Editor/Correspondent, Washington Desk

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's senior political editor/correspondent. Based in Washington, D.C., his work appears on air and online delivering analysis of the political climate in Washington and campaigns. He also helps edit political coverage.

Montanaro joined NPR in 2015 and oversaw coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign, including for broadcast and digital.

Before joining NPR, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and taught high school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a life-long Mets fan and college basketball junkie.

Story Archive

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis waves as he arrives for a news conference on Sept. 7. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

7 weeks from Election Day, migrants take center stage in political theater

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Then-candidate Joe Biden speaks at a community event while campaigning on December 13, 2019 in San Antonio, Texas. Daniel Carde/Getty Images hide caption

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It's General Election Season! Live From Texas

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Abortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Dec. 1, 2021. Heading in the 2022 midterm elections, abortion leads as the top issue for Democrats. For Republicans, it is inflation. For independents, inflation also tops and abortion ranks second. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A duck prepares to land on a pond in front of the Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on May 4, 2010. JEWEL SAMAD/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Former President Donald Trump arrives on stage at a rally in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., on Sept. 3. According to a new poll, 67% of independents do not want Trump to run again, while just 28% said they do. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Two-thirds of independents say they don't want Trump to run for president

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Former president Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally to support local candidates on September 03, 2022 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Former President Donald Trump tosses hats into the crowd before addressing attendees during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Fla. Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

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Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP

Voting stickers sit on a a table during Primary Election Day on August 23, 2022 in New York.(Photo by Yuki IWAMURA / AFP) (Photo by YUKI IWAMURA/AFP via Getty Images) YUKI IWAMURA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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YUKI IWAMURA/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden delivers a prime-time speech Thursday night at Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Biden's speech walks a fine line in its attack on MAGA Republicans

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This image contained in a court filing by the Department of Justice on Aug. 30, and redacted by in part by the FBI, shows a photo of documents seized during the Aug. 8 search by the FBI of former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida. Department of Justice hide caption

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Department of Justice

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 03: Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) receives the gavel from Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) during the first session of the 116th Congress at the U.S. Capitol January 03, 2019 in Washington, DC. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Politics chat: U.S. intelligence will conduct damage assessment of recovered Mar-a-Lago documents

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Democrat Pat Ryan speaks during a campaign rally Monday in Kingston, N.Y., before defeating Republican Marc Molinaro in Tuesday's special election for New York's 19th Congressional District. Ryan had stressed abortion rights on the trail. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes who is running to become the Democratic nominee for the U.S. senate speaks during a campaign event at The Wicked Hop on August 07, 2022 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Democrats Claw Back Ground In Fight For Senate Control

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