Domenico Montanaro Domenico Montanaro is a senior political editor/correspondent for the Washington Desk
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
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Domenico Montanaro

Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Domenico Montanaro

Senior Political Editor/Correspondent, Washington Desk

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's senior political editor/correspondent. Based in Washington, D.C., his work appears on air and online delivering analysis of the political climate in Washington and campaigns. He also helps edit political coverage.

Montanaro joined NPR in 2015 and oversaw coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign, including for broadcast and digital.

Before joining NPR, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and taught high school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a life-long Mets fan and college basketball junkie.

Story Archive

Friday

A COVID-19 testing site stands on a sidewalk in Midtown Manhattan on December 09, 2022 in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Thursday

President Biden speaks at the National Prayer Breakfast on Feb. 3, 2022, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Congress takes reins of prayer breakfast from secretive Christian evangelical group

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Wednesday

Scandals have led Congress to become more involved in bipartisan political breakfast

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U.S. President Donald Trump greets U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley during an event celebrating Women's History Month, in the East Room at the White House March 29, 2017 in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Monday

Donald Trump participates in the first prime-time presidential debate hosted by FOX News and Facebook at the Quicken Loans Arena August 6, 2015 in Cleveland, Ohio. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Saturday

Week in politics: Why Biden changed his mind on Ukraine; Trump's waning influence

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Wednesday

MEXICO CITY, MEXICO - JANUARY 10: U.S. President Joe Biden speaks during a message for the media as part of the '2023 North American Leaders' Summit at Palacio Nacional on January 10, 2023 in Mexico City, Mexico. Hector Vivas/Getty Images hide caption

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Democrats are trying to revamp their presidential primary calendar

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Tuesday

What we know about the classified documents found in Biden's think tank

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CLEMMONS, N.C. - NOVEMBER 08: A sign directing voters at a polling location on November 8, 2022 in Clemmons, North Carolina, United States. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Signs used for polling stations are seen in a bin at the El Paso County Courthouse during the presidential primary Texas on Super Tuesday, March 3, 2020. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

Saturday

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 07: A worker replaces a sign over the office of U.S. Speaker of the House Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) after being elected as Speaker in the U.S. Capitol Building on January 07, 2023 in Washington, DC. After four days of voting and 15 ballots McCarthy secured enough votes to become Speaker of the House for the 118th Congress. (Photo by Nathan Howard/Getty Images) Nathan Howard/Getty Images hide caption

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McCarthy Prevails, Becomes Speaker In Late-Night House Vote

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Friday

US Republican Representative of California Kevin McCarthy listens as lawmakers take a 13th vote for House Speaker at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2023. (Photo by OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images) OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

The ongoing quest for accountability two years after the Jan. 6 riot

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Thursday

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 05: U.S. House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) gives a thumbs-up in the House Chamber during the third day of elections for Speaker of the House at the U.S. Capitol Building on January 05, 2023 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

House Impasse Continues

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