Domenico Montanaro Domenico Montanaro is a senior political editor/correspondent for the Washington Desk
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
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Domenico Montanaro

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Domenico Montanaro - 2015
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Domenico Montanaro

Senior Political Editor/Correspondent, Washington Desk

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's senior political editor/correspondent. Based in Washington, D.C., his work appears on air and online delivering analysis of the political climate in Washington and campaigns. He also helps edit political coverage.

Montanaro joined NPR in 2015 and oversaw coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign, including for broadcast and digital.

Before joining NPR, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and taught high school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a life-long Mets fan and college basketball junkie.

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A city street is closed this month for repairs and upgrades in Orlando, Fla. As part of an infrastructure proposal by the Biden administration, $115 billion is earmarked to modernize bridges, highways and roads. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

African Methodist Episcopal Church Bishop Reginald Jackson announces a boycott of Coca-Cola products outside the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta on March 25 because he said Coca-Cola and other large Georgia companies hadn't done enough to oppose restrictive voting bills. Coca-Cola spoke out against a voting bill after it was signed into law. Jeff Amy/AP hide caption

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Jeff Amy/AP

Securing the Capitol or Fencing in Democracy? And, Biden's Policy Strategy

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Biden's Early Legislation Decisions Win Praise From Strategists

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Activists Stoke Corporate Backlash To Voting Restrictions

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Two-thirds of American adults polled approve of the job that President Biden is doing with the coronavirus pandemic. That's nearly twice as high as those who say the same of Biden's job on immigration. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden gives his first news conference of his presidency Thursday at the White House. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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President Biden speaks Tuesday about a mass shooting in Boulder, Colo., where 10 people were killed at a grocery store. It's just one issue Biden may be asked about in his first news conference as president. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Former President Donald Trump, who was booted off Twitter and other social media platforms, is teasing the possibility of launching his own platform. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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