Domenico Montanaro Domenico Montanaro is a senior political editor/correspondent for the Washington Desk
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
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Domenico Montanaro

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Domenico Montanaro - 2015
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Domenico Montanaro

Senior Political Editor/Correspondent, Washington Desk

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's senior political editor/correspondent. Based in Washington, D.C., his work appears on air and online delivering analysis of the political climate in Washington and campaigns. He also helps edit political coverage.

Montanaro joined NPR in 2015 and oversaw coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign, including for broadcast and digital.

Before joining NPR, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and taught high school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a life-long Mets fan and college basketball junkie.

Story Archive

Vice President Harris and Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg tour electric vehicle operations at a Charlotte Area Transit System bus garage on Thursday. The two were in North Carolina to promote the new infrastructure law. Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden delivers remarks on the economy and lowering prices at the White House on Tuesday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

House Democrats Pass Biden's Social Programs Bill

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Federal judge rejects Trump's bid to block the release of Jan. 6 documents

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Protesters gather at a rally to demonstrate against the LA City Council's COVID-19 vaccine mandate for city employees and contractors on Monday in Los Angeles. A new study from the Pew Research Center breaks down ideology within political parties, including by views on the role of government. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Virginia Elects Republican Glenn Youngkin As Governor

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Supporters of Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin celebrate during an election night rally on Tuesday in Chantilly, Va. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Republican Glenn Youngkin captures the governor's mansion in Virginia

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Virginia Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin arrives to speak at an election night party in Chantilly early Wednesday. Youngkin topped Democrat Terry McAuliffe, flipping the Virginia governor's office back to the GOP. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Most Americans trust that elections are fair. But only a third of Republicans agree, a poll finds. Kaz Fantone for NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone for NPR

Most Americans trust elections are fair, but sharp divides exist, a new poll finds

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Democrats scramble to finalize spending package before Biden's trip abroad

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Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., arrives at the U.S. Capitol on Oct. 5. Her opposition to Democrats' proposed spending package is forcing changes, but her specific positions have been hard to pin down. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Negotiations over a once-and-former $3.5 trillion spending pack continue

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