Domenico Montanaro Domenico Montanaro is a senior political editor/correspondent for the Washington Desk
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
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Domenico Montanaro

Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Domenico Montanaro - 2015
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Domenico Montanaro

Senior Political Editor/Correspondent, Washington Desk

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's senior political editor/correspondent. Based in Washington, D.C., his work appears on air and online delivering analysis of the political climate in Washington and campaigns. He also helps edit political coverage.

Montanaro joined NPR in 2015 and oversaw coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign, including for broadcast and digital.

Before joining NPR, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and taught high school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a life-long Mets fan and college basketball junkie.

Story Archive

California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a No on the Recall campaign event with Vice President Harris on Wednesday in San Leandro, Calif. President Biden is set to campaign with Newsom on Monday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

There's A Chance That California Will Soon Have A Republican Governor

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The U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, which saw scenes of desperation and violence inside and outside of Kabul's airport, has coincided with a drop in President Biden's approval rating. Biden has fiercely defended the evacuation. Taylor Crul/U.S. Air Force via Getty Images hide caption

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Taylor Crul/U.S. Air Force via Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., are attempting to maneuver two spending bills through Congress. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

The Chaotic U.S. Withdrawal From Afghanistan Puts Biden In A Political Hole

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Election Officials Still Get Death Threats

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President Biden departs after speaking from the White House Treaty Room on April 14 to announce the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan. Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, here in March, has announced he is stepping down. It's a remarkable turn of events from last year when Cuomo was seen as a rising star in the Democratic Party for his handling of the coronavirus pandemic. Seth Wenig/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Seth Wenig/Pool/AFP via Getty Images