Miles Parks Miles Parks is a correspondent on NPR's Washington Desk, where he covers voting and election security.
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Miles Parks

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Miles Parks headshot
Colin Marshall/NPR

Miles Parks

Correspondent, Washington Desk

Miles Parks is a correspondent on NPR's Washington Desk, where he covers voting and election security.

He began covering election issues after the 2016 presidential election, and his work was cited in the Senate Intelligence Committee's report on Russian election interference.

In 2020, Parks and Iowa Public Radio's Kate Payne broke the news that Iowa Democrats were planning to use an untested and potentially vulnerable app to transport their Caucus results.

He has also reported extensively on misinformation. As Covid-19 vaccines were being rolled out in the U.S., Parks used data analysis to show that misleading information about the shots was going viral on social media.

Parks joined NPR as the 2014-15 Stone & Holt Weeks Fellow, and considers that fellowship the greatest honor of his life so far.

A graduate of the University of Tampa, Parks also previously covered local politics for The Washington Post and The Ledger in Lakeland, Fla.

In his spare time, Parks likes playing, reading and thinking about basketball. He wrote The Washington Post's obituary of legendary women's basketball coach Pat Summitt.

Story Archive

Students of Unified Educational Centers (CEU) attend a lesson on 'Fake News: access, security and veracity of information', in Sao Paulo, Brazil on June 21, 2018. Media analysis is a compulsory subject in Brazilian schools. MIGUEL SCHINCARIOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MIGUEL SCHINCARIOL/AFP via Getty Images

Brazil's President Sows Distrust In Election — Sound Familiar?

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The Presidential Election Reform Act was introduced by Reps. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo. (left), and Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., both of whom sit on the Democratic-led House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

The House just passed a bill that would make it harder to overthrow an election

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U.S. President Joe Biden speaks during the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) at U.N. headquarters on September 21, 2022 in New York City. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Biden: Russia's Invasion "Should Make Your Blood Run Cold"

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Voting stickers sit on a a table during Primary Election Day on August 23, 2022 in New York.(Photo by Yuki IWAMURA / AFP) (Photo by YUKI IWAMURA/AFP via Getty Images) YUKI IWAMURA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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YUKI IWAMURA/AFP via Getty Images

A disconnected Albert sensor in Lincoln County, Wash. Lincoln County Commissioner Rob Coffman hide caption

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Lincoln County Commissioner Rob Coffman

Some Republicans in Washington state cast a wary eye on an election security device

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Mar-a-Lago Affidavit Released; Combatting Election Security Disinformation

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Top election officials in a Texas county quit after threats stemming from 2020

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Kansas state Rep. Stephanie Clayton, an abortion rights supporter who was a Republican and is now a Democrat, reacts as a referendum to strip abortion rights out of the state constitution fails. Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR hide caption

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Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR

Abortion Rights Activists Win Big In Kansas (And Other Primary Results)

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Mark Finchem, a Republican candidate for Arizona secretary of state, waves to the crowd as he arrives to speak at a rally put on by former President Donald Trump in Arizona on July 22. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

US Kills al-Qaida Leader In Drone Strike; Pelosi Visits Taiwan, Rankling China

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