Miles Parks Miles Parks is a correspondent on NPR's Washington Desk, where he covers voting and election security.
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Midterm results show voters reject election denialism

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Jim Marchant, center, GOP nominee for secretary of state in Nevada, lost his election and also underperformed fellow Republicans running for U.S. senator and governor. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Ballot counters process absentee ballots on Nov. 8 at Huntington Place in Detroit. The scene this year was much calmer than 2020, when protesters descended on Detroit and yelled for election officials to "stop the count!" Jose Juarez/AP hide caption

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Jose Juarez/AP

Election officials feared the worst. Here's why baseless claims haven't fueled chaos

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Several election deniers have lost secretary of state races

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A voter casts their ballot at the Hillel Foundation on Tuesday in Madison, Wis. Jim Vondruska/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Vondruska/Getty Images

Voting was largely uneventful despite fears of intimidation and conspiracies

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The pandemic changed how — and when — Americans vote

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From left to right: Republican secretary of state nominees Jim Marchant of Nevada, Kristina Karamo of Michigan and Mark Finchem of Arizona have all denied the legitimacy of the 2020 election. Marco Bello/Reuters; Scott Olson/Getty Images; Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Marco Bello/Reuters; Scott Olson/Getty Images; Mario Tama/Getty Images

Election deniers could oversee voting in key swing states. Here are races to watch

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Election deniers are seeking to become their state's top election official

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A man shouts into a bullhorn as Trump supporters gather in front of the Maricopa County Elections Department in Phoenix, where ballots were being counted following the 2020 presidential election. Federal officials have warned about violence erupting after this year's election, with experts particularly concerned about the period after Nov. 8. Olivier Touron/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Touron/AFP via Getty Images

Concerns of violence grow as Election Day nears

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Concerns of political violence loom days before the midterms

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