Miles Parks Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk. He covers voting and elections, and also reports on breaking news.
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Miles Parks

Voters in New York soundly rejected two ballot measures that would have allowed for expanded voting access in the state. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

What 2021's recent elections tell us about voting in 2022 and beyond

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Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin casts his ballot early, in September. Youngkin has walked a tight rope on voting issues ahead of Tuesday's election. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Republicans want more eyes on election workers. Experts worry about their intent

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The impact of social media on kids is again the focus of a Senate hearing

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The founder and CEO of Tusk Holdings, Bradley Tusk, speaks onstage during TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2016 in San Francisco. On Thursday, he announced a $10 million grant for internet voting development. Steve Jennings/Getty Images for TechCrunch hide caption

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Steve Jennings/Getty Images for TechCrunch

The Use Of Ballot Drop Boxes May Change Due To Republican Pushback

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Larry Elder, Newsom's Main Opponent, Stoked Fears Of Election Fraud

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Former President Donald Trump, seen here Saturday, has made unfounded claims about fraud affecting the California gubernatorial recall election. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Officials Fear A New Normal As Republicans Make Baseless California Fraud Claims

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A Utah poll worker checks a voter ID during the 2016 presidential election. Eleven states have strict voter ID laws, while 24 have less stringent laws for an ID to vote. Democrats have begun to lower their resistance to the issue. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Democrats Are Now Open To New Voter ID Rules. It Probably Won't Win Over The GOP

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Democrats Might Be More Open To Voter ID Laws, Which They've Long Opposed

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Jen Easterly, director of the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, speaks with Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose, left, during the summer meeting of the National Association of Secretaries of State. Christina Almeida Cassidy/AP hide caption

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Christina Almeida Cassidy/AP

Death Threats And Conspiracy Theories: Why 2020 Won't End For Election Officials

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American commentator Ben Shapiro is seen on set during a taping of the Candace podcast in March in Nashville, Tenn. Jason Kempin/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Kempin/Getty Images

Outrage As A Business Model: How Ben Shapiro Is Using Facebook To Build An Empire

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Contractors working for Cyber Ninjas, the company hired by the Republican-led Arizona state Senate, examine and recount ballots from the 2020 general election on May 3. Courtney Pedroza/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Courtney Pedroza/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Experts Call It A 'Clown Show' But Arizona 'Audit' Is A Disinformation Blueprint

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Audit In Arizona Is 'A Threat To The Overall Confidence Of Democracy,' Critic Says

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Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook, speaks virtually during a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee hearing in March. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Facebook Calls Links To Depression Inconclusive. These Researchers Disagree

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