Miles Parks
Miles Parks
Stories By

Miles Parks

Colin Marshall/NPR
Miles Parks
Colin Marshall/NPR

Miles Parks

Reporter, Washington Desk

Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk. He covers election interference and voting infrastructure and reports on breaking news.

Miles joined NPR as the 2014-15 Stone & Holt Weeks Fellow. Since then, he's investigated FEMA's efforts to get money back from Superstorm Sandy victims, profiled budding rock stars, and produced for all three of NPR's weekday news magazines.

A graduate of the University of Tampa, Miles also previously covered crime and local government for The Washington Post and The Ledger in Lakeland, Fla.

In his spare time, Miles likes playing, reading and thinking about basketball. He wrote The Washington Post's obituary of legendary women's basketball coach Pat Summitt.

You can contact Miles at mparks@npr.org.

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The warden of the Metropolitan Correctional Center in New York City has been reassigned and two others suspended pending official investigations, the Justice Department said. Mark Lennihan/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Election Security At Def Con

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Activists at the Supreme Court opposed to partisan gerrymandering hold up representations of congressional districts from North Carolina (left) and Maryland on March 26. On June 27, justices decided that the practice is beyond the reach of federal courts. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

To Gerrymander Or Not To Gerrymander? That's The Question For Democrats

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What's The Next Step For Democrats, Following Ruling On Partisan Redistricting?

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People rally in front of the Supreme Court on March 26 as the court hears arguments in redistricting cases. The court ruled that partisan redistricting is a political question, not one that federal courts can weigh in on. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Rules Partisan Gerrymandering Is Beyond The Reach Of Federal Courts

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Sara Fitzgerald and Michael Martin, both with the group One Virginia, protest gerrymandering in front of the Supreme Court in March 2018. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Redistricting Guru's Hard Drives Could Mean Legal, Political Woes For GOP

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Election Security After Mueller's Exit

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A poll worker uses an electronic poll book to help voters check in at a polling center last November in Provo, Utah. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Technology Has Made Voting Lines Move Faster But Also Made Elections Less Secure

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Security Experts Express Concern Over Electronic System To Check-In At Polling Places

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A Republican observer looks at a ballot during a hand recount last November in Broward County, Fla. Florida officials and lawmakers are still learning about cyberattacks there. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

'Possible' More Counties Than Now Known Were Hacked In 2016, Fla. Delegation Says

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Sen. James Lankford, R.-Okla., said he worries an opportune moment may pass following the release of the Mueller report without new action to secure U.S. elections. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Mueller Report Elicited A Lot Of Conversation — But Little Election Legislation

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