Miles Parks Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk. He covers election interference and voting infrastructure and reports on breaking news.
Miles Parks
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Miles Parks

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Miles Parks
Colin Marshall/NPR

Miles Parks

Reporter, Washington Desk

Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk. He covers election interference and voting infrastructure and reports on breaking news.

Parks joined NPR as the 2014-15 Stone & Holt Weeks Fellow. Since then, he's investigated FEMA's efforts to get money back from Superstorm Sandy victims, profiled budding rock stars and produced for all three of NPR's weekday news magazines.

A graduate of the University of Tampa, Parks also previously covered crime and local government for The Washington Post and The Ledger in Lakeland, Fla.

In his spare time, Parks likes playing, reading and thinking about basketball. He wrote The Washington Post's obituary of legendary women's basketball coach Pat Summitt.

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Story Archive

FBI headquarters in Washington. The bureau is changing its policy on election security notifications to prepare for the 2020 presidential race. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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J. David Ake/AP

Iowa Democrats Will Use A Smartphone App At Caucuses, Despite Cybersecurity Concerns

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Precinct leaders across Iowa will use their own smartphones to transmit the results of next month's Iowa caucuses. JGI/Tom Grill/Tetra images RF/Getty Images hide caption

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JGI/Tom Grill/Tetra images RF/Getty Images

Despite Election Security Fears, Iowa Caucuses Will Use New Smartphone App

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell laughed Monday when asked about Democrats' decision to delay sending articles of impeachment to his chamber. The tension comes amid debate over whether the trial will include witnesses. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Courtney Parker votes on a new voting machine in Dallas, Ga., last November. Whereas Georgia voters statewide are expected to vote on new machines in 2020, millions of voters across the country are expected to use machines that are more than a decade old. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

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Mike Stewart/AP

Kentucky Incumbent Governor Wants Recanvassing

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President Trump smiles behind Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin during a rally at Rupp Arena in Lexington, Ky., on Nov. 4. Both Trump and Bevin have made unsubstantiated claims about election fraud. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Despite unanswered questions about security and transparency, mobile voting pilots aimed at overseas and military voters move forward in a number of states. Above, wristbands noting "I Voted Today!" are available at Sojourn Community Church in Louisville, Ky., on Election Day this year. John Sommers II/Getty Images hide caption

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John Sommers II/Getty Images

In 2020, Some Americans Will Vote On Their Phones. Is That The Future?

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