Miles Parks
Colin Marshall/NPR
Miles Parks
Colin Marshall/NPR

Miles Parks

Producer and reporter, Washington Desk

Miles Parks is a reporter and producer on NPR's Washington Desk. He covers election interference and voting infrastructure and reports on breaking news.

Miles joined NPR as the 2014-15 Stone & Holt Weeks Fellow. Since then, he's investigated FEMA's efforts to get money back from Superstorm Sandy victims, profiled budding rock stars, and produced for all three of NPR's weekday news magazines.

A graduate of the University of Tampa, Miles also previously covered crime and local government for The Washington Post and The Ledger in Lakeland, Fla.

In his spare time, Miles likes playing, reading and thinking about basketball. He wrote The Washington Post's obituary of legendary women's basketball coach Pat Summitt.

You can contact Miles at mparks@npr.org.

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Story Archive

Bins of signs are seen at an election office in San Antonio, Texas. The first primaries of the 2018 elections are less than a month away, and the Department of Homeland Security held a classified briefing last week to further explain voter system threats to election directors and secretaries of state. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

FBI Director Christopher Wray (from left), CIA Director Mike Pompeo, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Robert Ashley, NSA Director Adm. Michael Rogers and National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Director Robert Cardillo testify before the Senate intelligence committee on Tuesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Amtrak has experienced four fatal crashes since December, and last year's 828 railroad deaths marked the deadliest year on rail in at least a decade, according to Politico. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., ranking member of the House intelligence committee, speaks during a media availability after a closed-door meeting of the committee on Monday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump speaks with White House secretary Rob Porter (center) and Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, outside the White House in December. Porter resigned this week amid allegations of domestic violence against his ex-wives. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Carryn Owens, the widow of Navy SEAL William "Ryan" Owens, fought back tears as President Trump addressed her during his 2017 speech to a joint session of Congress. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Pennsylvania is one of the states that mostly rely on antiquated voting machines that store votes electronically, without printed ballots or other paper-based backups that could be used to double-check the balloting. There's almost no way to know if they've accurately recorded individual votes, or if anyone tampered with the count. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Robert Mueller is sworn in on Capitol Hill, prior to testifying before the House Judiciary Committee in 2013. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The U.S. Capitol is seen reflected in the windows of the Capitol Visitors Center as lawmakers worked to avert a government shutdown on Friday in Washington, D.C. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Former Democratic Sen. John Tunney greets supporters at a 1976 Jimmy Carter campaign stop in Pomona, Calif. Tunney died Friday, at age 83. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

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George Rose/Getty Images