Miles Parks Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk, where he covers voting and election security.
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Miles Parks

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Miles Parks headshot
Colin Marshall/NPR

Miles Parks

Reporter, Washington Desk

Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk, where he covers voting and election security.

He began covering election issues after the 2016 presidential election, and his work was cited in the Senate Intelligence Committee's report on Russian election interference.

In 2020, Parks and Iowa Public Radio's Kate Payne broke the news that Iowa Democrats were planning to use an untested and potentially vulnerable app to transport their Caucus results.

He has also reported extensively on misinformation. As Covid-19 vaccines were being rolled out in the U.S., Parks used data analysis to show that misleading information about the shots was going viral on social media.

Parks joined NPR as the 2014-15 Stone & Holt Weeks Fellow, and considers that fellowship the greatest honor of his life so far.

A graduate of the University of Tampa, Parks also previously covered local politics for The Washington Post and The Ledger in Lakeland, Fla.

In his spare time, Parks likes playing, reading and thinking about basketball. He wrote The Washington Post's obituary of legendary women's basketball coach Pat Summitt.

Story Archive

Kansas state Rep. Stephanie Clayton, an abortion rights supporter who was a Republican and is now a Democrat, reacts as a referendum to strip abortion rights out of the state constitution fails. Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR hide caption

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Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR

Abortion Rights Activists Win Big In Kansas (And Other Primary Results)

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Mark Finchem, a Republican candidate for Arizona secretary of state, waves to the crowd as he arrives to speak at a rally put on by former President Donald Trump in Arizona on July 22. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

US Kills al-Qaida Leader In Drone Strike; Pelosi Visits Taiwan, Rankling China

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Arizona state Rep. Mark Finchem speaks during an election rally in Richmond, Va., on Oct. 13, 2021. Finchem is now running for Arizona secretary of state, with former President Donald Trump's endorsement. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Election deniers are running to control voting. Here's how they've fared so far

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Then-Vice President Mike Pence is seen presiding over a joint session of Congress to certify the 2020 Electoral College results after a mob of pro-Trump supporters stormed the Capitol. Proposed changes to the Electoral Count Act would clarify the vice president's role in counting states' electoral votes. Erin Schaff/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Schaff/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Two canvassers are seen last year on Michelle Garcia's front-door camera in in Pueblo, Colo. The men said they were "doing a voter verification project." Michelle Garcia hide caption

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Michelle Garcia

The election denial movement is now going door to door

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Election judge Michael Firth of Denver, Colorado waits for voters to drop off ballots at a drive-thru ballot drop location outside the Denver Elections Division Building on November 3, 2020 in Denver, Colorado. Marc Piscotty/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Piscotty/Getty Images

Election Conspiracy Theorists Are Canvasing The Country, Searching For Fraud

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Some who think 2020's election was stolen are going door-to-door to audit the results

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Encore: Midterms election misinformation

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NPR used social media and news reports to track four key men spreading misinformation about the 2020 election (from left to right): MyPillow CEO and longtime Trump supporter Mike Lindell, former high school math and science teacher Douglas Frank, former law professor David Clements, and former U.S. Army Captain Seth Keshel. Chet Strange/Getty Images; David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP; Jonathan Drake and Brian Snyder/Reuters hide caption

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Chet Strange/Getty Images; David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP; Jonathan Drake and Brian Snyder/Reuters