Miles Parks Miles Parks is a correspondent on NPR's Washington Desk, where he covers voting and election security.
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Miles Parks

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Miles Parks headshot
Colin Marshall/NPR

Miles Parks

Correspondent, Washington Desk

Miles Parks is a correspondent on NPR's Washington Desk, where he covers voting and election security.

He began covering election issues after the 2016 presidential election, and his work was cited in the Senate Intelligence Committee's report on Russian election interference.

In 2020, Parks and Iowa Public Radio's Kate Payne broke the news that Iowa Democrats were planning to use an untested and potentially vulnerable app to transport their Caucus results.

He has also reported extensively on misinformation. As Covid-19 vaccines were being rolled out in the U.S., Parks used data analysis to show that misleading information about the shots was going viral on social media.

Parks joined NPR as the 2014-15 Stone & Holt Weeks Fellow, and considers that fellowship the greatest honor of his life so far.

A graduate of the University of Tampa, Parks also previously covered local politics for The Washington Post and The Ledger in Lakeland, Fla.

In his spare time, Parks likes playing, reading and thinking about basketball. He wrote The Washington Post's obituary of legendary women's basketball coach Pat Summitt.

Story Archive

Tuesday

Bins labelled Ballots rejected as illegal and Ballots accepted as legal sit at the Miami Dade County Elections Department in Miami, Florida, on November 8, 2022. EVA MARIE UZCATEGUI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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EVA MARIE UZCATEGUI/AFP via Getty Images

Friday

A fox walks near Upper Senate Park on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol on April 05, 2022 in Washington, DC. Several individuals have reported being approached and bitten by a fox. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

"Can't Let It Go" Holiday Spectacular 2022

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Thursday

Legislation passed by Congress would clarify that the vice president's role in certifying the Electoral College vote is ceremonial. Here, then-Vice President Mike Pence is seen in the House chamber early on Jan. 7, 2021, to finish the work of the Electoral College after a mob loyal to President Donald Trump stormed the Capitol. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Friday

The Twitter sign is seen at their headquarters on October 28, 2022 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Constanza HEVIA / AFP) (Photo by CONSTANZA HEVIA/AFP via Getty Images) CONSTANZA HEVIA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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CONSTANZA HEVIA/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY), Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) watch as joint services military honor guard carries the casket of the late Sen. Robert Dole (R-KS) down the steps of the U.S. Capitol after lying in state on December 10, 2021 in Washington, DC. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Wednesday

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) answers questions at the U.S. Capitol February 7, 2017 in Washington, DC. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Kevin McCarthy Faces A Likely Bruising Path To Speaker Of The House

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Friday

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 08: House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) delivers remarks to supporters alongside Ronna Romney McDaniel, Republican National Committee chair, and Rep. Tom Emmer (R-MN), at a watch party at the Westin Hotel on November 9, 2022 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images) Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Weekly Roundup: November 25, 2022

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Wednesday

Midterm results show voters reject election denialism

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Monday

Clark County Election Department workers process polling place equipment and materials at an initial verification area at the Clark County Election Department after polls closed on November 08, 2022 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images) Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Misinformation's Limited Impact On The Midterms

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Saturday

Jim Marchant, center, GOP nominee for secretary of state in Nevada, lost his election and also underperformed fellow Republicans running for U.S. senator and governor. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Monday

Ballot counters process absentee ballots on Nov. 8 at Huntington Place in Detroit. The scene this year was much calmer than 2020, when protesters descended on Detroit and yelled for election officials to "stop the count!" Jose Juarez/AP hide caption

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Jose Juarez/AP

Election officials feared the worst. Here's why baseless claims haven't fueled chaos

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Saturday

Friday

Thursday

Stop the Steal signs are seen during the Kentucky Freedom Rally at the capitol building on August 28, 2021 in Frankfort, Kentucky Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Several election deniers have lost secretary of state races

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