Miles Parks Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk. He covers voting and elections, and also reports on breaking news.
Miles Parks
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Miles Parks

Colin Marshall/NPR
Miles Parks
Colin Marshall/NPR

Miles Parks

Reporter, Washington Desk

Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk. He covers voting and elections, and also reports on breaking news.

Parks joined NPR as the 2014-15 Stone & Holt Weeks Fellow. Since then, he's investigated FEMA's efforts to get money back from Superstorm Sandy victims, profiled budding rock stars and produced for all three of NPR's weekday news magazines.

A graduate of the University of Tampa, Parks also previously covered crime and local government for The Washington Post and The Ledger in Lakeland, Fla.

In his spare time, Parks likes playing, reading and thinking about basketball. He wrote The Washington Post's obituary of legendary women's basketball coach Pat Summitt.

Story Archive

Former President Donald Trump at a rally in Phoenix, Ariz., on July 24, 2021. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Pressed on his election lies, former President Trump cuts NPR interview short

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., walks to the Senate floor at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. McConnell says he may be open to reforming the Electoral Count Act. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Supreme Court Weighs Vaccines Mandates

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People who believe Trump's election lies are running for offices that control voting

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Disinformation fueled 2021, and 2022 will likely see the same

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Our Favorite Political Music of 2021

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Our Favorite Political TV Of 2021

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What Does It Take To Combat Disinformation?

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Voters in New York soundly rejected two ballot measures that would have allowed for expanded voting access in the state. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

What 2021's recent elections tell us about voting in 2022 and beyond

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Biden's Election Was Legitimate. Republicans Have Convinced Supporters It Wasn't.

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Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger speaks during a news conference in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore) John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin casts his ballot early, in September. Youngkin has walked a tight rope on voting issues ahead of Tuesday's election. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Republicans want more eyes on election workers. Experts worry about their intent

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