Miles Parks Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk. He covers voting and elections, and also reports on breaking news.
Miles Parks
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Miles Parks

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Miles Parks
Colin Marshall/NPR

Miles Parks

Reporter, Washington Desk

Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk. He covers voting and elections, and also reports on breaking news.

Parks joined NPR as the 2014-15 Stone & Holt Weeks Fellow. Since then, he's investigated FEMA's efforts to get money back from Superstorm Sandy victims, profiled budding rock stars and produced for all three of NPR's weekday news magazines.

A graduate of the University of Tampa, Parks also previously covered crime and local government for The Washington Post and The Ledger in Lakeland, Fla.

In his spare time, Parks likes playing, reading and thinking about basketball. He wrote The Washington Post's obituary of legendary women's basketball coach Pat Summitt.

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Story Archive

Sen. Roy Blunt (left) said he was "prepared to look at more money for the states to use for elections this year." But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (right) has said that such requests are a non-starter. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Los Angeles Lakers superstar LeBron James has started a voting rights organization, and is urging NBA teams to offer their large venues as polling sites during the pandemic. Ezra Shaw/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

Need A Polling Place With Social Distancing? 3 NBA Teams Offer Venues

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For decades, D.C. license plates have bemoaned the district's lack of representation. There are renewed efforts in Congress to grant D.C. statehood. Owen Byrne/Flickr hide caption

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Owen Byrne/Flickr

Some Longtime D.C. Residents Still Vote In Other States. Is That ... Legal?

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In an NPR interview, U.S. Attorney General William Barr defended the Justice Department amid accusations of political interference, including recently in the case of former national security adviser Michael Flynn. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

Attorney General Barr Says DOJ Acts Independent Of Trump's Interests

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Clark County, Nev., election worker Stean Durias scans mail ballots at the Clark County Election Department this month. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Nina Ahmad declared victory as the Democratic nominee for Pennsylvania auditor general nine days after the state's June 2 primary. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

This November, Election Night Could Stretch Into Election Week Or Month

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View from the Ground At Washington DC Protests; Misinformation Spreads Online

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Hackers backed by China and Iran sent phishing emails attempting to steal the email credentials of campaign staffers for both major political parties. Nicolas Armer/DPA via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Armer/DPA via Getty Images

An election worker sorts vote-by-mail ballots for Washington state's presidential primary on March 10 in Renton, a suburb of Seattle. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

An election official waits to check in voters behind a plastic barrier Tuesday at a polling place at McKinley Technology High School in Washington, D.C. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A fake story began circulating Sunday evening into Monday morning, which was then disputed by real journalists as well as a number of bots. Experts say the campaign may have been meant to make people question whether anything they see online is true. Twitter Screenshot hide caption

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Twitter Screenshot

'None Of This Is True': Protests Become Fertile Ground for Online Disinformation

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Listener Question On The Elections During The Pandemic, Answered

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