Miles Parks Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk. He covers voting and elections, and also reports on breaking news.
Miles Parks
Stories By

Miles Parks

Colin Marshall/NPR
Miles Parks
Colin Marshall/NPR

Miles Parks

Reporter, Washington Desk

Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk. He covers voting and elections, and also reports on breaking news.

Parks joined NPR as the 2014-15 Stone & Holt Weeks Fellow. Since then, he's investigated FEMA's efforts to get money back from Superstorm Sandy victims, profiled budding rock stars and produced for all three of NPR's weekday news magazines.

A graduate of the University of Tampa, Parks also previously covered crime and local government for The Washington Post and The Ledger in Lakeland, Fla.

In his spare time, Parks likes playing, reading and thinking about basketball. He wrote The Washington Post's obituary of legendary women's basketball coach Pat Summitt.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

With Control Of Congress, Democrats Aim To Address Voting Rights

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/960060852/960060853" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gabriel Sterling, Georgia's voting system implementation manager, fact-checks President Trump's false claims about voting at a news conference Monday. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, is one of the more than 100 House Republicans who say they plan to object to some states' election results during Wednesday's Electoral College vote counting process. Matt McClain/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt McClain/AP

A sample ballot is shown via the Dominion Voting Systems that Georgians use to vote. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Bazemore/AP

The Toll Of Conspiracy Theories: A Voting Security Expert Lives In Hiding

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/948828692/949926224" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and President-elect Joe Biden last week in Wilmington, Del. They were formally elected Monday by the Electoral College. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP