Miles Parks Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk, where he covers voting and election security.
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Miles Parks

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Miles Parks headshot
Colin Marshall/NPR

Miles Parks

Reporter, Washington Desk

Miles Parks is a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk, where he covers voting and election security.

He began covering election issues after the 2016 presidential election, and his work was cited in the Senate Intelligence Committee's report on Russian election interference.

In 2020, Parks and Iowa Public Radio's Kate Payne broke the news that Iowa Democrats were planning to use an untested and potentially vulnerable app to transport their Caucus results.

He has also reported extensively on misinformation. As Covid-19 vaccines were being rolled out in the U.S., Parks used data analysis to show that misleading information about the shots was going viral on social media.

Parks joined NPR as the 2014-15 Stone & Holt Weeks Fellow, and considers that fellowship the greatest honor of his life so far.

A graduate of the University of Tampa, Parks also previously covered local politics for The Washington Post and The Ledger in Lakeland, Fla.

In his spare time, Parks likes playing, reading and thinking about basketball. He wrote The Washington Post's obituary of legendary women's basketball coach Pat Summitt.

Story Archive

Voters With Disabilities Worry About Their Ability To Cast Ballots In Wisconsin

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Kristina Karamo, who is headed toward becoming the Republican nominee for secretary of state in Michigan, gets an endorsement from Trump during his April 2 rally. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Michigan GOP moves forward with 2020 election-denying secretary of state and AG

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Kristina Karamo, who is running for the Michigan Republican Party's nomination for secretary of state, gets an endorsement from Trump during his April 2 rally. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

This weekend's Michigan GOP convention marks a key moment for election denialism

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New Jersey gubernatorial candidate Jack Ciattarelli, a Republican, concedes the race to Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy on Nov. 12, 2021 — 10 days after Election Day. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

After 2020, a candidate conceding an election is no longer a sure thing

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Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during a press conference in 2018. Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, donated hundreds of millions of dollars to local election officials leading up to the 2020 election. Bertrand Guay/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bertrand Guay/AFP via Getty Images

Private funding saved the 2020 election. Now, some GOP-led states are banning it

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Election workers in Georgia count ballots at State Farm Arena in Atlanta in 2020. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

1 in 5 local election officials say they're likely to quit before 2024

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Rep. Jody Hice, R-Ga., speaks with supporters during a campaign event at the Flying Machine restaurant in Lawrenceville, Ga. Hice, one of the nation's preeminent election deniers, is running for Georgia secretary of state. Alyssa Pointer for NPR hide caption

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Alyssa Pointer for NPR

Georgia's race to oversee voting pits an election denier against an election defender

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Changes To Texas Voting Rules Worry Older Voters And Those With Disabilities

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Georgia Republicans will choose between candidates that supported or denounced Trump

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