Jessica Taylor Jessica Taylor is the lead digital political reporter for NPR. Based in Washington, D.C., she covers the 2016 elections and national politics for NPR digital.
Jessica Taylor at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Jessica Taylor

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Jessica Taylor at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Jessica Taylor

Political Reporter

Jessica Taylor is the lead digital political reporter for NPR. Based in Washington, D.C., she covers the 2016 elections and national politics for NPR digital.

Before joining NPR in May 2015, Taylor was the campaign editor for The Hill newspaper where she oversaw the newspaper's 2014 midterm coverage, managed a team of political reporters and wrote her own biweekly column.

Prior to The Hill, Taylor was a writer and producer for MSNBC's "The Daily Rundown with Chuck Todd" and a contributor to the NBC News Political Unit. She covered and reported on the 2012 election as a senior analyst for The Rothenberg Gonzales Political Report. Her quotes have appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today, as well as several state and regional newspapers across the country. Taylor has also appeared on MSNBC, Fox News, C-SPAN, CNN and other local network affiliates.

On Election Night 2012, Jessica served as an off-air analyst for CBS News in New York, advising producers and reporters on House and Senate races.

Previously, Jessica was editor of National Journal's "House Race Hotline" and Assistant Editor for POLITICO during the 2010 midterms. She began her career in Washington as the research director for The Almanac of American Politics.

A native of Elizabethton, Tenn., she is a graduate of Furman University in Greenville, S.C. and now lives in Alexandria, Va.

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President Trump speaks at the Joint Systems Manufacturer on Wednesday in Lima, Ohio. Trump visited the northeastern Ohio defense manufacturing plant to discuss his successes in the economy, job growth, John McCain and ISIS. Andrew Spear/Getty Images hide caption

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In her bid for the presidency, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., is pushing for a breakup of big tech companies, including Facebook and Amazon. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren Blasts Big Tech, Advocates Taxing Rich In 2020 Race

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The enthusiasm generated by former three-term Rep. Beto O'Rourke may seem reminiscent of another politician who had only spent a few years in Congress before running for the White House — President Barack Obama. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Sen. Kamala Harris, a former prosecutor, says she was "born realizing the flaws in the criminal justice system." The California Democrat is not only seeking to become the first woman to be president, but the first black woman. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

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In Pitch For President, Sen. Kamala Harris Focuses On Criminal Justice, Inequality

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Former Vice President Joe Biden has yet to announce whether he will run for president in 2020, but there may be an opening in the field for a candidate with cross-party appeal. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Following a report about the close relationship between Fox News and the Trump White House, Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez said the Democratic Party will not allow the network to host any of its primary debates in 2020. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg called President Trump "a threat to our country" but warned, "We cannot allow the primary process to drag the party to an extreme that would diminish our chances in the general election" and give Trump four more years. Steve Pope/Getty Images hide caption

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Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper talks about his two terms as the chief executive of Colorado in his office in the State Capitol in Denver in December 2018. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Michael Cohen used his public testimony to detail how far he went to protect Trump. Republicans questioned his credibility and motives. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Former Vice President Joe Biden said Tuesday that he's "very close" to reaching a decision on whether to run for president in 2020, but that his family has given him their blessing if he does. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Mark Harris, Republican candidate in North Carolina's 9th Congressional race, fights back tears at the conclusion of his son John Harris' testimony during a public evidentiary hearing on the 9th Congressional District voting irregularities investigation last week. Travis Long/AP hide caption

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