Jessica Taylor Jessica Taylor is the lead digital political reporter for NPR. Based in Washington, D.C., she covers the 2016 elections and national politics for NPR digital.
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Jessica Taylor at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Jessica Taylor

Political Reporter

Jessica Taylor is the lead digital political reporter for NPR. Based in Washington, D.C., she covers the 2016 elections and national politics for NPR digital.

Before joining NPR in May 2015, Taylor was the campaign editor for The Hill newspaper where she oversaw the newspaper's 2014 midterm coverage, managed a team of political reporters and wrote her own biweekly column.

Prior to The Hill, Taylor was a writer and producer for MSNBC's "The Daily Rundown with Chuck Todd" and a contributor to the NBC News Political Unit. She covered and reported on the 2012 election as a senior analyst for The Rothenberg Gonzales Political Report. Her quotes have appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today, as well as several state and regional newspapers across the country. Taylor has also appeared on MSNBC, Fox News, C-SPAN, CNN and other local network affiliates.

On Election Night 2012, Jessica served as an off-air analyst for CBS News in New York, advising producers and reporters on House and Senate races.

Previously, Jessica was editor of National Journal's "House Race Hotline" and Assistant Editor for POLITICO during the 2010 midterms. She began her career in Washington as the research director for The Almanac of American Politics.

A native of Elizabethton, Tenn., she is a graduate of Furman University in Greenville, S.C. and now lives in Alexandria, Va.

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Story Archive

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., listens to Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh as he testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 6. Running a tight re-election race in a conservative state, Manchin has faced pressure to support Kavanaugh. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo answers a question as Democratic New York gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Nixon looks on during a gubernatorial debate at Hofstra University last month. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Cynthia Nixon Discusses Her Candidacy For Governor Of New York

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Chris Pappas participates in a debate of Democratic hopefuls in New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District at St. Anselm College in Manchester, N.H., earlier this month. Pappas won the Tuesday, Sept. 11, Democratic primary and will represent his party in the November general election. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Former President Barack Obama speaks to students at the University of Illinois, where he accepted the Paul H. Douglas Award for Ethics in Government on Friday in Urbana. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Voter turnout in primaries and special elections has dramatically increased this year compared to past midterm elections. Turnout for Democrats has climbed 78 percent, while Republicans have seen a 23 percent uptick. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Democrats' 2018 Primary Turnout Mirrors Previous Wave Elections

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After Struggling To Turn Out Voters, Democrats Hope 2018 Will Be Different

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Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., speaks onstage at The Human Rights Campaign 2018 Los Angeles Gala Dinner at JW Marriott Los Angeles earlier this year. She's running this year for Senate, aiming to be just the second LGBTQ person elected to that body. Rich Fury/Getty Images hide caption

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Rise Of LGBTQ Candidates Could Usher In A 'Rainbow Wave' In 2018

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President Trump listens as Florida GOP gubernatorial candidate Ron DeSantis speaks at a Make America Great Again Rally in Tampa last month. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Ron DeSantis is hoping an endorsement from President Trump can buoy him over establishment favorite Adam Putnam, Florida's agriculture commissioner, in the Republican gubernatorial primary. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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President Trump held a rally Tuesday night but waited until Wednesday to respond to the legal troubles of two close associates. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Day After Cohen Guilty Plea, Trump Contradicts His Former Personal Lawyer

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Vermont Democratic gubernatorial nominee Christine Hallquist, a transgender woman and former electric company executive, applauds with her supporters during her election night party in Burlington, Vt. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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