Jessica Taylor Jessica Taylor is the lead digital political reporter for NPR. Based in Washington, D.C., she covers the 2016 elections and national politics for NPR digital.
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Jessica Taylor - 2015
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Jessica Taylor

Political Reporter

Jessica Taylor is the lead digital political reporter for NPR. Based in Washington, D.C., she covers the 2016 elections and national politics for NPR digital.

Before joining NPR in May 2015, Taylor was the campaign editor for The Hill newspaper where she oversaw the newspaper's 2014 midterm coverage, managed a team of political reporters and wrote her own biweekly column.

Prior to The Hill, Taylor was a writer and producer for MSNBC's "The Daily Rundown with Chuck Todd" and a contributor to the NBC News Political Unit. She covered and reported on the 2012 election as a senior analyst for The Rothenberg Gonzales Political Report. Her quotes have appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today, as well as several state and regional newspapers across the country. Taylor has also appeared on MSNBC, Fox News, C-SPAN, CNN and other local network affiliates.

On Election Night 2012, Jessica served as an off-air analyst for CBS News in New York, advising producers and reporters on House and Senate races.

Previously, Jessica was editor of National Journal's "House Race Hotline" and Assistant Editor for POLITICO during the 2010 midterms. She began her career in Washington as the research director for The Almanac of American Politics.

A native of Elizabethton, Tenn., she is a graduate of Furman University in Greenville, S.C. and now lives in Alexandria, Va.

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Story Archive

Sen. John McCain called President Trump's news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin "one of the most disgraceful performances by an American president in memory." Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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President Trump and Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, who announced his retirement on Wednesday, at the public swearing-in ceremony for Justice Neil Gorsuch at the White House in April 2017. Trump will announce his pick to replace Kennedy on July 9. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Progressive challenger Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez celebrates with supporters at a victory party in the Bronx after upsetting incumbent Democratic Rep. Joseph Crowley on Tuesday night. Scott Heins/Getty Images hide caption

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Then-candidate Donald Trump is introduced by then-South Carolina Lt. Gov. Henry McMaster at a campaign rally in Florence, S.C., in 2016. Now Trump is president and McMaster is governor and campaigning for a full term. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., confer during a news conference following a closed-door GOP meeting on immigration last week. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen takes questions from reporters at the White House on Monday. She acknowledged that the Trump administration changed the way it is enforcing immigration law, resulting in separation of thousands of children from parents entering the country illegally. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Defiant Homeland Security Secretary Defends Family Separations

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Rudy Giuliani, former New York City mayor and current lawyer for President Trump, speaks to members of the media during a White House Sports and Fitness Day last month. Giuliani suggested Friday that presidential pardons could be given to people caught up in the Mueller investigation. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump stands on the podium in Singapore with his arms outstretched and answers a final question from reporters. Back in the U.S., he was flexing his muscles in GOP primaries. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Mark Sanford, R-S.C., waits for his introduction during a town hall meeting last year in Hilton Head, S.C., in front of a sign from a protester. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Will Voters Tell Mark Sanford To 'Take A Hike' For His Criticism Of Trump?

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Kelly Sadler, shown in March, is no longer employed as a special assistant to President Trump. Last month, after Sen. John McCain urged senators to vote against Gina Haspel's nomination to head the CIA, Sadler reportedly said, "It doesn't matter, he's dying anyway." Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Republican gubernatorial candidate John Cox speaks to supporters in San Diego on Tuesday. He advanced to the general election against Democrat Gavin Newsom, giving the GOP a foothold in a top statewide race. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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