Jessica Taylor Jessica Taylor is the lead digital political reporter for NPR. Based in Washington, D.C., she covers the 2016 elections and national politics for NPR digital.
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Jessica Taylor - 2015
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Jessica Taylor

Political Reporter

Jessica Taylor is the lead digital political reporter for NPR. Based in Washington, D.C., she covers the 2016 elections and national politics for NPR digital.

Before joining NPR in May 2015, Taylor was the campaign editor for The Hill newspaper where she oversaw the newspaper's 2014 midterm coverage, managed a team of political reporters and wrote her own biweekly column.

Prior to The Hill, Taylor was a writer and producer for MSNBC's "The Daily Rundown with Chuck Todd" and a contributor to the NBC News Political Unit. She covered and reported on the 2012 election as a senior analyst for The Rothenberg Gonzales Political Report. Her quotes have appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today, as well as several state and regional newspapers across the country. Taylor has also appeared on MSNBC, Fox News, C-SPAN, CNN and other local network affiliates.

On Election Night 2012, Jessica served as an off-air analyst for CBS News in New York, advising producers and reporters on House and Senate races.

Previously, Jessica was editor of National Journal's "House Race Hotline" and Assistant Editor for POLITICO during the 2010 midterms. She began her career in Washington as the research director for The Almanac of American Politics.

A native of Elizabethton, Tenn., she is a graduate of Furman University in Greenville, S.C. and now lives in Alexandria, Va.

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Story Archive

The U.S. Capitol is seen reflected in the windows of the Capitol Visitors Center as lawmakers worked to avert a government shutdown on Friday in Washington, D.C. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., answers questions Thursday on the possibility of a government shutdown. After receiving assurances from Ryan, a key group of conservative House Republicans said they would support a short-term-funding bill. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Americans give President Trump relatively positive marks on his handling of ISIS and the state of the economy. Olivier Douliery/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Majority Of Americans See Trump's First Year As A Failure

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President Trump shakes hands with White House physician Ronny Jackson, following his annual physical at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Jan. 12. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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White House Doctor Says Trump Is In 'Excellent' Physical, Cognitive Health

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A White House statement issued Thursday notably did not deny that President Trump used the vulgarity to refer to African countries, but Friday morning, Trump wrote: "This was not the language used." Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Oprah Winfrey accepts the 2018 Cecil B. DeMille Award during the 75th Annual Golden Globe Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday. Winfrey's speech spurred talk of a possible presidential run. NBCUniversal via Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., announced Wednesday that he is retiring from Congress and would not be seeking re-election, the 31st House Republican to do so. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Darrell Issa To Retire, Adding To Record GOP Exodus From Congress

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Publication of Michael Wolff's new book about the Trump White House was moved up, despite the president's threat to block it. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images hide caption

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'People Regret What They Said To Me,' Michael Wolff Tells NPR About Trump Book

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President Trump speaks during a lunch meeting with Republican members of the Senate as Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., looks on. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Flake Not Ruling Out 2020 Challenge To Trump

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Steve Bannon was quoted in a new book calling the meeting that Donald Trump Jr. and other top Trump campaign advisers took with Russian intermediaries in June 2016 "treasonous" and "unpatriotic." Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump, flanked by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and Vice President Pence, speaks during the first meeting of his Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in July. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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