Danielle Kurtzleben Danielle Kurtzleben is a political correspondent assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.
Danielle Kurtzleben - square 2015
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Danielle Kurtzleben

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Danielle Kurtzleben - 2015
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Danielle Kurtzleben

Political Correspondent

Danielle Kurtzleben is a political correspondent assigned to NPR's Washington Desk. She appears on NPR shows, writes for the web, and is a regular on The NPR Politics Podcast. She is covering the 2020 presidential election, with particular focuses on on economic policy and gender politics.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Kurtzleben spent a year as a correspondent for Vox.com. As part of the site's original reporting team, she covered economics and business news.

Prior to Vox.com, Kurtzleben was with U.S. News & World Report for nearly four years, where she covered the economy, campaign finance and demographic issues. As associate editor, she launched Data Mine, a data visualization blog on usnews.com.

A native of Titonka, Iowa, Kurtzleben has a bachelor's degree in English from Carleton College. She also holds a master's degree in global communication from George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

Story Archive

In their Democratic presidential primary, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders had a heated debate in 2016 about what "progressive" means. Even now, it's not totally clear. Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images

More And More Democrats Embrace The 'Progressive' Label. Here's Why

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COVID-19 vaccine and testing signage is displayed at a City of Long Beach mobile vaccination clinic at California State University, Long Beach, campus on Wednesday in California. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Can The Government Make Me Get The COVID Vaccine?

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Biden's Next Infrastructure Challenge: Democrats

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Left: Congressional candidate Nina Turner speaks during a 'Get Out the Vote' canvassing event on Monday in Cleveland, Ohio. Right: Cuyahoga Councilwoman and congressional candidate Shontel Brown speaks during a Souls to the Polls rally at Sanctuary Baptist Church on Sunday in Cleveland, Ohio. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Nina Turner, a candidate running in a special Democratic primary for Ohio's 11th Congressional District, speaks with supporters near the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections in Cleveland before casting her early vote on July 7. Phil Long/AP hide caption

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Phil Long/AP

Democrats Crowd Cleveland For A Primary That Reflects Party Tensions

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The First $1.2 Trillion Infrastructure Deal Vote Failed. It Doesn't Really Matter.

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All Eyes On Ohio: People, Money And Energy Are Flooding Into A Cleveland Area Primary

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New Pew Study Explains Joe Biden's 2020 Presidential Victory

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We Just Got Our Clearest Picture Yet Of How Biden Won In 2020

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Incoming President Biden and Vice President Harris stand with their respective spouses Jill Biden and Doug Emhoff after delivering remarks in Wilmington, Del., on Nov. 7, the day the Democrats were declared the winners in the 2020 election. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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We Just Got Our Clearest Picture Yet Of How Biden Won In 2020

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According to one new account of the Trump presidency, even telling the story of Donald Trump's COVID-19 diagnosis was difficult due to the chaos in the White House. Here, Trump removes his mask after being discharged from the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in October. Ken Cedeno/Polaris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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The 1st Wave Of Post-Trump Books Arrives. And They Fight To Make Sense Of The Chaos

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