Danielle Kurtzleben Danielle Kurtzleben is a political correspondent assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.
Danielle Kurtzleben - square 2015
Stories By

Danielle Kurtzleben

Caitlin Sanders/NPR
Danielle Kurtzleben - 2015
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Danielle Kurtzleben

Political Correspondent

Danielle Kurtzleben is a political correspondent assigned to NPR's Washington Desk. She appears on NPR shows, writes for the web, and is a regular on The NPR Politics Podcast. She is covering the 2020 presidential election, with particular focuses on on economic policy and gender politics.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Kurtzleben spent a year as a correspondent for Vox.com. As part of the site's original reporting team, she covered economics and business news.

Prior to Vox.com, Kurtzleben was with U.S. News & World Report for nearly four years, where she covered the economy, campaign finance and demographic issues. As associate editor, she launched Data Mine, a data visualization blog on usnews.com.

A native of Titonka, Iowa, Kurtzleben has a bachelor's degree in English from Carleton College. She also holds a master's degree in global communication from George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

Story Archive

People attend the March for Life rally on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Friday. The march, in its 49th year, comes as a Supreme Court decision on abortion rights could unravel Roe v. Wade. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

Capitol Police Are Still Dealing With The Aftermath Of January 6th

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1070341218/1070345357" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Same-sex marriage supporters wear "Just married" shirts while celebrating the U.S Supreme Court ruling regarding same-sex marriage on June 26, 2015 in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The story of marriage equality is more complicated — and costly — than you remember

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1068894397/1069319590" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Cate Blanchett, Tyler Perry, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Jennifer Lawrence in Don't Look Up. Niko Tavernise/Netlfix hide caption

toggle caption
Niko Tavernise/Netlfix

Abortion-rights activists hold signs outside the Supreme Court on Oct. 4. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

More activists who have had abortions are saying so out loud. Here's why

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1050653918/1053442996" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript