Danielle Kurtzleben Danielle Kurtzleben is a political reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.
Danielle Kurtzleben - square 2015
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Danielle Kurtzleben

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Danielle Kurtzleben - 2015
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Danielle Kurtzleben

Political Reporter

Danielle Kurtzleben is a political reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk. She appears on NPR shows, writes for the web, and is a regular on the NPR Politics Podcast. She is covering the 2020 presidential election, with particular focuses on on economic policy and gender politics.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Kurtzleben spent a year as a correspondent for Vox.com. As part of the site's original reporting team, she covered economics and business news.

Prior to Vox.com, Kurtzleben was with U.S. News & World Report for nearly four years, where she covered the economy, campaign finance and demographic issues. As associate editor, she launched Data Mine, a data visualization blog on usnews.com.

A native of Titonka, Iowa, Kurtzleben has a bachelor's degree in English from Carleton College. She also holds a master's degree in global communication from George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

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Story Archive

Still frames from the 60 MINUTES hour on Sunday Oct. 25, 2020 with the presidential candidates. CBS Photo Archive/CBS via Getty Images hide caption

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CBS Photo Archive/CBS via Getty Images

Joe Biden Won The Election—But He's Still Left Waiting In The Wings.

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A couple watches the election results at a Republican watch party at Huron Valley Guns in New Hudson, Mich. People watching the results come in saw President Trump outperforming his position in preelection polls. Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Why Were The Polls Off? Pollsters Have Some Early Theories

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Record Number Of Republican Women Elected To The New Congress

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President Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive to speak to members of the U.S. military during an unannounced trip to Al-Asad Air Base in Iraq in 2018. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Trump Has Weaponized Masculinity As President. Here's Why It Matters

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20 Million Americans Have Already Voted. That's A Lot.

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People participate in the Women's March as they protest against the U.S. President Donald Trump in Washington, United States on January 18, 2020. Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Feminists Weigh Their Wins And Losses After Nearly Four Years Of Trump

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