Danielle Kurtzleben Danielle Kurtzleben is a political correspondent assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.
Danielle Kurtzleben - square 2015
Stories By

Danielle Kurtzleben

Caitlin Sanders/NPR
Danielle Kurtzleben - 2015
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Danielle Kurtzleben

Political Correspondent

Danielle Kurtzleben is a political correspondent assigned to NPR's Washington Desk. She appears on NPR shows, writes for the web, and is a regular on The NPR Politics Podcast. She is covering the 2020 presidential election, with particular focuses on on economic policy and gender politics.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Kurtzleben spent a year as a correspondent for Vox.com. As part of the site's original reporting team, she covered economics and business news.

Prior to Vox.com, Kurtzleben was with U.S. News & World Report for nearly four years, where she covered the economy, campaign finance and demographic issues. As associate editor, she launched Data Mine, a data visualization blog on usnews.com.

A native of Titonka, Iowa, Kurtzleben has a bachelor's degree in English from Carleton College. She also holds a master's degree in global communication from George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

Story Archive

Friday

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) (L) shakes hands with former U.S. President Donald Trump (R) during a rally at the Banks County Dragway on March 26, 2022 in Commerce, Georgia. Megan Varner/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Megan Varner/Getty Images

Friction within the GOP causes some Republicans to question what their philosophy is

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1151957898/1151957899" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Peterson Foundation billboard displaying the national debt is pictured on K Street on February 08, 2022 in downtown Washington, DC. (Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Peter G. Peterson Foundation) Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Peter G. Peters hide caption

toggle caption
Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Peter G. Peters

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen listens to President Biden during an October 2021 meeting with Cabinet members and corporate chief executives to discuss the looming federal debt limit. Two years later, the debt limit is once again an economic threat. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

4 ways around a debt ceiling crisis — and why they might not work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1149511364/1149737519" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Sunday

Pundits are suggesting creative workarounds to avoid a debt ceiling crisis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1149318587/1149318588" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

This combination of pictures created on November 11, 2022 shows US President Joe Biden (L) and China's President Xi Jinping (R). MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

US President Donald Trump signs an executive order as Chief of Staff Reince Priebus looks on in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC, January 23, 2017. SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY), Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) watch as joint services military honor guard carries the casket of the late Sen. Robert Dole (R-KS) down the steps of the U.S. Capitol after lying in state on December 10, 2021 in Washington, DC. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Saturday

Strategists are analyzing how abortion influenced people's voting in the midterms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139266636/1139266637" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 08: House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) delivers remarks to supporters alongside Ronna Romney McDaniel, Republican National Committee chair, and Rep. Tom Emmer (R-MN), at a watch party at the Westin Hotel on November 9, 2022 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images) Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Weekly Roundup: November 25, 2022

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1138952491/1138959475" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer shows a "My Body My Decision" shirt at the 14th District Democratic headquarters in Detroit on Nov. 8. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

What we know (and don't know) about how abortion affected the midterms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139040227/1139190290" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Donald Trump is officially running for president in 2024

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1137076815/1137076816" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday