Danielle Kurtzleben Danielle Kurtzleben is a political correspondent assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.
Danielle Kurtzleben - square 2015
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Danielle Kurtzleben

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Danielle Kurtzleben - 2015
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Danielle Kurtzleben

Political Correspondent

Danielle Kurtzleben is a political correspondent assigned to NPR's Washington Desk. She appears on NPR shows, writes for the web, and is a regular on The NPR Politics Podcast. She is covering the 2020 presidential election, with particular focuses on on economic policy and gender politics.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Kurtzleben spent a year as a correspondent for Vox.com. As part of the site's original reporting team, she covered economics and business news.

Prior to Vox.com, Kurtzleben was with U.S. News & World Report for nearly four years, where she covered the economy, campaign finance and demographic issues. As associate editor, she launched Data Mine, a data visualization blog on usnews.com.

A native of Titonka, Iowa, Kurtzleben has a bachelor's degree in English from Carleton College. She also holds a master's degree in global communication from George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

Story Archive

Strategists are analyzing how abortion influenced people's voting in the midterms

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WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 08: House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) delivers remarks to supporters alongside Ronna Romney McDaniel, Republican National Committee chair, and Rep. Tom Emmer (R-MN), at a watch party at the Westin Hotel on November 9, 2022 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images) Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Weekly Roundup: November 25, 2022

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Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer shows a "My Body My Decision" shirt at the 14th District Democratic Headquarters in Detroit on November 8. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

What we know (and don't know) about how abortion affected the midterms

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Donald Trump is officially running for president in 2024

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How the hot-button issues of abortion and inflation played out in Midterm elections

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Check in with three battleground states: Georgia, Arizona and Wisconsin

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Iowa Republican congressional candidate Zach Nunn speaks at an October campaign event outside Des Moines. Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR hide caption

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Voters everywhere are talking about the same issues. Here's why that matters

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How abortion is affecting midterm elections

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It's been a pretty contentious debate season for Senate midterm races

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The Jan. 6th Committee Voted to Subpoena Donald Trump. So, Now What?

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This April 26, 1989, file photo shows Norma McCorvey, left, known as "Jane Roe" in the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling, with attorney Gloria Allred in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. Greg Gibson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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This file photo shows Norma McCorvey (L) formally known as "Jane Roe", as she holds a pro-choice sign with former attorney Gloria Allred (R) in front of the US Supreme Court building 26 April 1989,in Washington, DC. GREG GIBSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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President Joe Biden holds a semiconductor during his remarks before signing an Executive Order on the economy in the State Dining Room of the White House on February 24, 2021 in Washington, DC. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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