Danielle Kurtzleben Danielle Kurtzleben is a political reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.
Danielle Kurtzleben - square 2015
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Danielle Kurtzleben

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Danielle Kurtzleben - 2015
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Danielle Kurtzleben

Political Reporter

Danielle Kurtzleben is a political reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk. She appears on NPR shows, writes for the web, and is a regular on the NPR Politics Podcast. She is covering the 2020 presidential election, with particular focuses on on economic policy and gender politics.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Kurtzleben spent a year as a correspondent for Vox.com. As part of the site's original reporting team, she covered economics and business news.

Prior to Vox.com, Kurtzleben was with U.S. News & World Report for nearly four years, where she covered the economy, campaign finance and demographic issues. As associate editor, she launched Data Mine, a data visualization blog on usnews.com.

A native of Titonka, Iowa, Kurtzleben has a bachelor's degree in English from Carleton College. She also holds a master's degree in global communication from George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

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Story Archive

US Added Jobs In June⁠—But Now The Pandemic Is Getting Worse

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Lauren Boebert, a restaurant owner in Colorado, will now be the Republican nominee in Colorado's 3rd District. She ousted five-term Congressman Scott Tipton on Tuesday night. Lauren Boebert campaign website hide caption

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Lauren Boebert campaign website

In this Friday, May 29, 2020, photo, Sara Adelman holds her daughter Amelia in Salt Lake City. Adelman is burning through her vacation time to help manage her current status as a working-from-home mom since her daughter's daycare closed due to the coronavirus pandemic. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

How Coronavirus Could Widen The Gender Wage Gap

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A man copies phone numbers posted on the locked doors of a Georgia Department of Labor office in in Norcross, Ga. Millennials are facing the second — or even third — economic downturn of their adult lives. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

Here We Go Again: Millennials Are Staring At Yet Another Recession

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Tensions Flare Near White House In Protests Sparked By George Floyd's Death

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Cory Obenour, chef and co-owner of the Blue Plate restaurant in San Francisco, prepares takeout and delivery orders. The restaurant received funds from the Paycheck Protection Program, according to The Associated Press. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

How Small Businesses Could Prepare For Reopening, Continued

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What Happened Today: Unemployment Keeps Rising, Economy Questions

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Theodore Johnson worked full time as a massage therapist at a luxury hotel in Texas. When the coronavirus crisis hit, he tried to get unemployment, but the system was overloaded. That sent him to an Amazon warehouse, where he now works. Heather King hide caption

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Heather King