Danielle Kurtzleben Danielle Kurtzleben is a political correspondent assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.
Danielle Kurtzleben - square 2015
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Danielle Kurtzleben

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Danielle Kurtzleben - 2015
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Danielle Kurtzleben

Political Correspondent

Danielle Kurtzleben is a political correspondent assigned to NPR's Washington Desk. She appears on NPR shows, writes for the web, and is a regular on The NPR Politics Podcast. She is covering the 2020 presidential election, with particular focuses on on economic policy and gender politics.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Kurtzleben spent a year as a correspondent for Vox.com. As part of the site's original reporting team, she covered economics and business news.

Prior to Vox.com, Kurtzleben was with U.S. News & World Report for nearly four years, where she covered the economy, campaign finance and demographic issues. As associate editor, she launched Data Mine, a data visualization blog on usnews.com.

A native of Titonka, Iowa, Kurtzleben has a bachelor's degree in English from Carleton College. She also holds a master's degree in global communication from George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

Story Archive

Race And Crime: Republicans Try To Shore Up Suburban Support

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Crime is in the spotlight in the U.S. Senate race in Wisconsin

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U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate in Ohio, greets supporters during a rally on May 2, 2022 in Lorain, Ohio. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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How abortion may be reshaping the close Ohio Senate race

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Trump holds rally in Youngston, Ohio as the race to the Senate heats up

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A voting sticker on the lapel of Ohio State Senator Matt Dolan. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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As the midterms approach, some Republicans are changing how they talk about abortion

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A man holds fake currency bearing the image of US President Donald Trump as he participates in a "Freedom Rally" protest in support of opening Florida in South Beach in Miami, on May 10, 2020. CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images

Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes who is running to become the Democratic nominee for the U.S. senate speaks during a campaign event at The Wicked Hop on August 07, 2022 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Democrats Claw Back Ground In Fight For Senate Control

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Ron DeSantis, seen speaking to reporters from Fox News in 2018 when he was running for governor of Florida, has been prominent in a recent trend of Republicans ignoring or actively avoiding mainstream press, particularly national outlets. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

Republicans have long feuded with the mainstream media. Now many are shutting them out

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Many Republicans on the campaign trail are shunning mainstream press

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Kansas state Rep. Stephanie Clayton, an abortion rights supporter who was a Republican and is now a Democrat, reacts as a referendum to strip abortion rights out of the state constitution fails. Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR hide caption

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Abortion Rights Activists Win Big In Kansas (And Other Primary Results)

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Kansans vote to keep abortion legal in the state, reject constitutional amendment

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Kansas votes on amendment that could lead to tighter abortion laws

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