Danielle Kurtzleben Danielle Kurtzleben is a political correspondent assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.
Danielle Kurtzleben - square 2015
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Danielle Kurtzleben

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Danielle Kurtzleben - 2015
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Danielle Kurtzleben

Political Correspondent

Danielle Kurtzleben is a political correspondent assigned to NPR's Washington Desk. She appears on NPR shows, writes for the web, and is a regular on The NPR Politics Podcast. She is covering the 2020 presidential election, with particular focuses on on economic policy and gender politics.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Kurtzleben spent a year as a correspondent for Vox.com. As part of the site's original reporting team, she covered economics and business news.

Prior to Vox.com, Kurtzleben was with U.S. News & World Report for nearly four years, where she covered the economy, campaign finance and demographic issues. As associate editor, she launched Data Mine, a data visualization blog on usnews.com.

A native of Titonka, Iowa, Kurtzleben has a bachelor's degree in English from Carleton College. She also holds a master's degree in global communication from George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

Story Archive

Demonstrators gathered to protest for reproductive rights at the Women's March

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Protesters across the U.S. march in opposition to Texas abortion law

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For White Evangelicals, The Identity Is About More Than Religious Faith

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Abortion-rights advocates march to the house of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh for a protest on Sept. 13 in Chevy Chase, Md. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Abortion rights hang in the balance, as advocates rally across the country

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The Women's March is returning on Saturday, this time in support of abortion rights

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Former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, a Democrat running for a second term, answers questions from the media after touring Whole Woman's Health of Charlottesville on Sept. 9. He's working to rally voters in response to Texas' restrictive new abortion law. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Far From Texas, The Virginia Governor's Race Will Test How Abortion Motivates Voters

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Virginia's Race For Governor Could Gauge How Texas' Abortion Laws May Motivate Voters

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