Danielle Kurtzleben Danielle Kurtzleben is a political reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.
Danielle Kurtzleben - square 2015
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Danielle Kurtzleben

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Danielle Kurtzleben - 2015
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Danielle Kurtzleben

Political Reporter

Danielle Kurtzleben is a political reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk. She appears on NPR shows, writes for the web, and is a regular on the NPR Politics Podcast. She is covering the 2020 presidential election, with particular focuses on on economic policy and gender politics.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Kurtzleben spent a year as a correspondent for Vox.com. As part of the site's original reporting team, she covered economics and business news.

Prior to Vox.com, Kurtzleben was with U.S. News & World Report for nearly four years, where she covered the economy, campaign finance and demographic issues. As associate editor, she launched Data Mine, a data visualization blog on usnews.com.

A native of Titonka, Iowa, Kurtzleben has a bachelor's degree in English from Carleton College. She also holds a master's degree in global communication from George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

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Story Archive

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive to speak to members of the U.S. military during an unannounced trip to Al-Asad Air Base in Iraq in 2018. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

20 Million Americans Have Already Voted. That's A Lot.

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People participate in the Women's March as they protest against the U.S. President Donald Trump in Washington, United States on January 18, 2020. Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Feminists Weigh Their Wins And Losses After Nearly Four Years Of Trump

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President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden's debate this week was low on substance and high on interruptions and aggression, particularly from Trump. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Two Million Americans Have Already Voted

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Mourners Gather At U.S. Supreme Court To Pay Respects To Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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An anti-abortion-rights activist demonstrates in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in June. Many Trump voters (or potential Trump voters) bring up abortion in explaining their voting rationale. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

The Complicated Importance Of Abortion To Trump Voters

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