Jeff Brady Jeff Brady is an NPR National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia. He covers the mid-Atlantic region and the energy industry.
Jeff Brady 2010
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Jeff Brady

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Jeff Brady 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jeff Brady

Correspondent, National Desk

Jeff Brady is a National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia, where he covers energy issues and climate change. Brady helped establish NPR's environment and energy collaborative which brings together NPR and Member station reporters from across the country to cover the big stories involving the natural world.

Brady approaches stories from the consumer side of the light switch and the gas pump in an effort to demystify an energy system that can seem complicated and opaque. Brady has reported on natural gas utilities fighting to preserve their business in a world more concerned about climate change, the long saga over the Keystone XL oil pipeline, the closing of a light bulb factory in Pennsylvania and how gas ranges pollute homes and make climate change worse.

In 2017 his reporting showed a history of racism and sexism that have made it difficult for the oil business to diversify its workforce. A union at the center of that reporting now faces a class-action lawsuit from its Black members.

In 2011 Brady led NPR's coverage of the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal at Penn State—from the night legendary football coach Joe Paterno was fired to the trial where Sandusky was found guilty.

In 2005, Brady was among the NPR reporters who covered the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. His reporting on flooded cars left behind after the storm exposed efforts to stall the implementation of a national car titling system. Today, the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System is operational and the Department of Justice estimates it could save car buyers up to $11 billion a year.

Before coming to NPR in September 2003, Brady was a reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) in Portland. He has also worked in commercial television as an anchor and a reporter, and in commercial radio as a talk-show host and reporter.

Brady graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Southern Oregon State College (now Southern Oregon University). In 2018 SOU honored Brady with its annual "Distinguished Alumni" award.

Story Archive

Biden signs executive order to make the federal government carbon-neutral by 2050

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U.S. to release 50 million barrels of crude oil from the reserve to lower gas prices

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U.S. to release oil reserves as the holiday travel season gears up

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The infrastructure bill could boost the industry removing carbon dioxide from the air

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Climate activists demonstrate at the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit in Glasgow, Scotland, Friday. Negotiators from almost 200 nations were making a fresh push to reach agreement on a series of key issues. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

A wind turbine in front of a steaming coal power plant in Gelsenkirchen, Germany in 2010. New reports find countries' latest promises to cut climate emissions are still not enough to avoid the worst impacts from warming. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP

The Biden administration is proposing new regulations to limit climate-warming methane emissions from oil and gas operations and pipelines. This undated file photo shows the Trans-Alaska pipeline and pump station north of Fairbanks. Al Grillo/AP hide caption

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Al Grillo/AP

As U.N. climate summit begins, export emissions are getting extra scrutiny

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The Asia Vision LNG carrier ship sits docked at the Cheniere Energy Inc. terminal in this aerial photograph taken over Sabine Pass in Texas in 2016. Lindsey Janies/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Lindsey Janies/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The U.S. wants to cut its own emissions, but plans to keep exporting fossil fuels

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Gas stoves emit pollution into your house and they are connected to a production and supply system that leaks the powerful greenhouse gas methane during drilling, fracking, processing and transport. Meredith Miotke for NPR hide caption

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Meredith Miotke for NPR

We need to talk about your gas stove, your health and climate change

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Biden's Climate Plan, Part Of The Budget Package, Is Stalled In Congress

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Steam rises from the Miller coal power plant in Adamsville, Ala., in April. An industry group says a climate plan in Congress would shut down all U.S. coal plants by 2030 or earlier. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Congress May Soon Pass The Country's Most Significant Climate Change Legislation Ever

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Ida's Remnants Devastated The Northeast. Climate Scientists Saw It Coming

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