Jeff Brady Jeff Brady is an NPR National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia. He covers the mid-Atlantic region and the energy industry.
Jeff Brady 2010
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Jeff Brady

Doby Photography /NPR
Jeff Brady 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jeff Brady

Correspondent, National Desk

Jeff Brady is a National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia, where he covers the mid-Atlantic region and energy issues. Brady helped establish NPR's environment and energy collaborative which brings together NPR and Member station reporters from across the country to cover the big stories involving the natural world.

Brady approaches energy stories from the consumer side of the light switch and the gas pump in an effort to demystify an industry that can seem complicated and opaque. Frequently traveling throughout the country for NPR, Brady has visited a solar power plant in the Nevada desert that lights casinos after the sun goes down. In 2017 his reporting showed a history of racism and sexism that have made it difficult for the oil business to diversify its workforce.

In 2011 Brady led NPR's coverage of the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal at Penn State—from the night legendary football coach Joe Paterno was fired to the trial where Sandusky was found guilty.

In 2005, Brady was among the NPR reporters who covered the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. His reporting on flooded cars left behind after the storm exposed efforts to stall the implementation of a national car titling system. Today, the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System is operational and the Department of Justice estimates it could save car buyers up to $11 billion a year.

Before coming to NPR in September 2003, Brady was a reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) in Portland. He has also worked in commercial television as an anchor and a reporter, and in commercial radio as a talk-show host and reporter.

Brady graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Southern Oregon State College (now Southern Oregon University). In 2018 SOU honored Brady with its annual "Distinguished Alumni" award.

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Story Archive

It's been 50 years since Philadelphia Eagles fans pelted Santa with snow balls from the stands. Some people say they are ashamed of what happened that day, while others remain unapologetic. Alex Pantling/Getty Images hide caption

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Philly Frustration, 1968: 'The Day That They Were All Against Everything'

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Carbon Engineering CEO Steve Oldham stands in front of the company's Squamish, British Columbia, pilot plant. It uses a chemical process to extract carbon dioxide from the air and turn it into a fuel similar to crude oil. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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How One Company Pulls Carbon From The Air, Aiming To Avert A Climate Catastrophe

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Leoyla Cowboy was among the many indigenous people from around the world who came to North Dakota to participate in the Dakota Access Pipeline protests. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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2 Years After Standing Rock Protests, Tensions Remain But Oil Business Booms

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An oil well just south of Watford City, North Dakota, is one of thousands drilled in recent years. The oil-rich Bakken shale formation has made North Dakota the second-largest crude-producing state behind only Texas. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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After Struggles, North Dakota Grows Into Its Ongoing Oil Boom

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North Dakota Native Americans Scramble For Voting IDs After Requirement Change

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Michael Recovery: Updating The Power Grid To Withstand Climate Change, Bigger Storms

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Cody Greenes (center), group leader with Moving Traditions, leads six high school boys in a discussion about sexual assault and consent. The program was designed to discuss difficult topics in an all-male setting. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Coming To The Right Answer By Themselves: Talking With Boys About Sexual Assault

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Horsham, Pa., is one of many towns around the country grappling with potentially harmful chemicals in its water. They're known as PFAS, and they're linked to cancer and other illnesses. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Decades-Old Chemicals, New Angst Over Drinking Water

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Prison Officials In 3 States Investigating Illnesses Related To Smuggled Drugs

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Environmental groups opposing the Constitution Pipeline rally outside the state Capitol on Tuesday, April 5, 2016, in Albany, N.Y. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

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Activists Have A New Strategy To Block Gas Pipelines: State's Rights

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Counterprotesters Outnumber White Supremacists Near White House

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White Supremacists, Counterprotesters Set To Converge At Lafayette Square

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QAnon: The Conspiracy Theorist Group That Appears At Trump Rallies

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