Jeff Brady Jeff Brady is an NPR National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia. He covers the mid-Atlantic region and the energy industry.
Jeff Brady 2010
Stories By

Jeff Brady

Trump Will Decide If U.S. Should Withdraw From Climate Accord

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/527555423/527560299" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jamie Ruppert of White Haven, Pa. is a swing voter who picked Donald Trump in the 2016 election. Nearly 100 days into his presidency she gives Trump a grade of C+ to B- but she still hopes for an A near the end of his time in office. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

Nearly 100 Days In, Trump Voter In One Rust Belt County Shares Concerns

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525044544/525310289" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At Kemper, Mississippi Power has built an entirely new coal plant from the ground up. But the plant, which uses carbon capture technology, has experienced missed deadlines, cost overruns and other problems. Courtesy of Mississippi Power hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Mississippi Power

Climate-Friendly Coal Technology Works But Is Proving Difficult To Scale Up

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521926674/521954102" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dakota Access Demonstrators Inspire New Pipeline Protests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/518858259/518858260" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jamie Ruppert (R) was featured in an NPR story about Obama voters who supported Donald Trump in last year's presidential election. Amy Whitenight (L) labeled Ruppert an "idiot" in a comment on NPR's Facebook page. They recently met in person to talk about their political differences. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

A Trump Voter And Facebook Insulter Talk It Out — In Person

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/514164988/514651002" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump signs one of five executive orders related to the oil pipeline industry. Trump has been busy for more than two weeks rolling back President Barack Obama's environmental legacy. Shawn Thew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Shawn Thew/Getty Images

'America First' Energy Plan Challenges Free Market Realities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/513905161/514161207" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Iraqi Wife In Detroit: U.S. Immigration Treated My Husband Like A Criminal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/512400274/512400275" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trump Takes Executive Action Designed To Speed Approval Of Oil Pipelines

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/511468450/511468451" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former Texas governor Rick Perry had his confirmation hearing Thursday as President-elect Donald Trump's pick for secretary of energy. He said he no longer wants to get rid of the agency. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Rick Perry, Energy Nominee, Says He No Longer Wants To Dissolve Agency

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/510585966/510628893" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jamie Ruppert and her husband Jesse Ruppert live in White Haven, Pa. Jamie voted for Barack Obama twice but switched parties and voted for Republican Donald Trump this election. She hopes Trump will bring more good-paying blue-collar jobs to communities like hers. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

A Trump Swing Voter Looks Ahead

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/509497278/509807356" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript